Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.


MDGuidelines Occupational Information for
Access Coordinator, Cable Television (Radio-Tv Broad.)

Instructs trainees in use of equipment; and operates equipment, such as camera, sound mixer, and videotape deck, to film events, to copy/edit graphics, voice, and music onto videotape, for broadcast on cable television: Determines time and day of class and plans outline of material to be covered. Distributes manuals, and instructs and demonstrates to trainees, care, setup and operation of equipment, such as tripods, microphones and portable camera. Prepares and administers written and practical tests to test trainees' knowledge. Determines equipment required to film event, and sets up and operates equipment, such as lights and portable camera to film event. Prepares script of filmed event. Loads videotape deck with videotape and instructs assistant to read script. Sets recording level, and records verbal description of event onto videotape, using videotaping equipment. Reviews videotape of filmed event, using videotaping equipment, to determine quality of video and color. Observes scales in video and color monitors and operates controls to adjust video and color levels. Enters written information about filmed event into graphic equipment. Plays musical selection, using stereo equipment, and adjusts controls to improve clarity and balance music. Sets inpoints and outpoints for graphics, voice, and music. Records graphics, voice, and music onto videotape, using audio/video equipment. Observes monitors to verify that video, voice, and music are synchronized during editing/copying process. Reviews assembled videotape, using videotaping equipment, to discern quality of video and audio signals, and operates controls to clarify and adjust video and audio signals. Edits manuals and schedules programs. May prepare report outlining past programs and future programs to be aired, and contents of programs. GOE: 05.03.05 STRENGTH: H GED: R4 M3 L4 SVP: 7 DLU: 88

This job title falls within the Heavy job class.
Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

The following medical conditions frequently affect employees with this job class:

Fracture
A fracture is a structural break and disruption in a bone of any size or shape. A fracture occurs when force is applied to a bone in an amount great...
Source - Medical Disability Advisor

Sprains and Strains, Back
A back sprain involves injury of one or more nonmuscular structures (such as ligament, disc, facet, or capsule) of the back, whereas a strain involv...
Source - Medical Disability Advisor

Muscle Injury
Any muscle in the body may be damaged or injured. The various types of muscle injuries are categorized as strains, bruises (contusions), detached in...
Source - Medical Disability Advisor

Repetitive Strain Injury
Repetitive strain injuries (RSI), also known as cumulative trauma disorders (CTD), are labels for musculoskeletal pain that is associated with physi...
Source - Medical Disability Advisor

Sprains and Strains, Lumbar Spine
The lumbar spine consists of five bony vertebrae separated by intervertebral discs. The lumbosacral region of the spine carries the upper body's wei...
Source - Medical Disability Advisor

Open Wound
An open wound is any injury that results in a break in the layers of the skin. Open wounds cover a spectrum of injuries, from a minor break at the s...
Source - Medical Disability Advisor

Sprains and Strains
Sprains are injuries to ligaments, the fibrous bands that connect bones to bones and stabilize joints. Strains are injuries to muscles or to tendons...
Source - Medical Disability Advisor

Sprains and Strains, Ankle
An ankle sprain is an injury to the ligaments around the ankle. An ankle strain is an injury to the tendons or muscles around the ankle. Ankle sprai...
Source - Medical Disability Advisor

Sprains and Strains, Knee
The knee is a weight-bearing joint and is supported by a system of ligaments, cartilages (medial and lateral menisci), muscles, and bone structure. ...
Source - Medical Disability Advisor

Puncture Wound
Puncture wounds are caused by objects that penetrate the skin and underlying tissues and structures. Wounds caused by nails, wires, needles, knives,...
Source - Medical Disability Advisor




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