Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Alcoholism


Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

Many employers have systems in place for individuals recovering from alcohol dependence disorders to return to work under special contracts or conditions. These conditions may provide guidelines for random testing of blood, breath, sweat, and urine levels of identified substances and provide work performance and substance abuse treatment guidelines for the recovering individual.

Temporary work accommodations may include reducing or eliminating activities where the safety of self or others is contingent upon a constant and/or high level of alertness, such as driving motor vehicles, operating complex machinery, or handling dangerous chemicals; introducing the individual to new or stressful situations gradually under individually appropriate supervision; allowing some flexibility in scheduling to attend therapy appointments (which normally should occur during employee's personal time); promoting planned, proactive management of identified problem areas; and offering timely feedback on job performance issues. It will be helpful if accommodations are documented in a written plan designed to promote a timely and safe transition back to full work productivity. A shift change to day shift may be necessary for more adequate monitoring.

If individuals have chronic side effects of prolonged alcohol intake, such as cardiac, liver, or nervous system damage, they may need to be transferred to sedentary activities. Certain jobs, such as being a bartender, hostess, or entertainer, may involve exposure to alcohol and increase the risk of relapse.

Risk: An individual who is alcohol-dependent may present a safety risk to both the individual and his or her coworkers; therefore, such individuals must be closely monitored and assigned only to job duties that are not safety-sensitive. Risk of recurrence may be reduced by eliminating exposure to alcohol in the workplace, performing regular yet random blood and/or urine tests to ensure compliance with the work contract, and by encouraging participation in therapy and support groups during the individual's personal time.

Capacity: Capacity is unaffected unless the individual comes to work inebriated, in which case he or she should be prevented from working. Prolonged alcoholism may contribute to impaired memory and coordination, peripheral neuropathy, and chronic illnesses, all of which may reduce productivity and work safety over time.

Tolerance: Tolerance is not a concern with this diagnosis.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor