Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Alzheimer's Disease


Related Terms

  • Alzheimer's Sclerosis
  • Presenile Dementia
  • Senile Dementia

Differential Diagnosis

  • Alcoholic dementia
  • Aphasia
  • Cortical basal ganglionic degeneration
  • Dementia in motor neuron disease
  • Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB)
  • Depression
  • Drug overdose
  • Frontal and temporal lobe dementia
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Lyme disease
  • Multiinfarct dementia
  • Neurosyphilis
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Parkinson's-plus syndromes
  • Prion-related diseases
  • Thyroid disease
  • Vitamin deficiency
  • Wilson's disease

Specialists

  • Neurologist
  • Physiatrist (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist)
  • Psychiatrist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Factors that may influence the length of disability include the general health and fitness of the individual before being diagnosed with AD, evidence of preexisting diseases affecting any of the major body systems (e.g., diabetes, chronic obstructive lung disease, and chronic heart disease), diagnosis of an acute disease or condition that requires surgery, the individual's mental and emotional stability, access to rehabilitation facilities and home health care, and the strength of the individual's support system.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
331.0 - Cerebral Degenerations, Other; Alzheimers Disease

Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

Very early in the course of the disease, limited work activities may be possible, depending on the nature of the work and the individual's degree of deficiency in areas critical to the performance of a particular job. In most cases, however, a plan for retirement may need to be arranged fairly soon after the diagnosis of AD.

Risk: Risk of working with early-stage AD includes forgetfulness and impaired cognitive skills that may affect the safety of the individual and his or her coworkers; individuals with AD should be removed from safety-sensitive job tasks for this reason. A structured work environment with familiar job duties may allow the individual to continue working until the disease progresses, after which time the individual will no longer be able to safely perform any job tasks.

Capacity: Capacity will be progressively affected by confusion, loss of judgment, and short-term memory loss. As individuals lose their mental and physical capacities, work capacity is also lost.

Tolerance: Individuals with early-stage AD who are aware that they are becoming forgetful may improve work tolerance by using clocks, calendars, and other external cues to compensate for their short-term memory loss. As the AD progresses and work capacity is lost, tolerance is no longer a factor.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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