Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Amputation


Specialists

  • General Surgeon
  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon
  • Physiatrist (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist)
  • Vascular Surgeon

Comorbid Conditions

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Other body parts injured by the trauma that caused the amputation
  • Peripheral vascular disease

Factors Influencing Duration

Presence of underlying disease such as diabetes or PVD in the retained limb(s), and atherosclerosis in other areas (coronary artery disease, cerebrovascular disease) will influence recovery time and an individual’s return to ambulation and activities. Additionally, the presence of complications, the particular limb or digit amputated, whether an amputated upper limb is the dominant limb, the individual's psychological status, whether or not a prosthesis will be used, the individual’s adaptation to the prosthesis, and the individual's job requirements may influence length of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
84.00 - Upper Limb Amputation, Not Otherwise Specified; Closed Flap Amputation of Upper Limb NOS; Kineplastic Amputation of Upper Limb NOS; Open or Guillotine Amputation of Upper Limb NOS; Revision of Current Traumatic Amputation of Upper Limb, NOS
84.01 - Amputation and Disarticulation of Finger
84.02 - Amputation and Disarticulation of Thumb
84.03 - Amputation through Hand; Amputation through Carpals
84.04 - Disarticulation of Wrist
84.05 - Amputation Through Forearm; Forearm Amputation
84.06 - Disarticulation of Elbow
84.07 - Amputation Through Humerus; Upper Arm Amputation
84.08 - Disarticulation of Shoulder
84.10 - Lower Limb Amputation, NOS; Closed Flap Amputation of Upper Limb NOS; Kineplastic Amputation of Upper Limb NOS; Open or Guillotine Amputation of Upper Limb NOS; Revision of Current Traumatic Amputation of Upper Limb, NOS
84.11 - Amputation of Toe; Amputation through Metatarsophalangeal Joint; Disarticulation of Toe; Metatarsal Head Amputation; Ray Amputation of Foot (Disarticulation of the Metatarsal Head of the Toe Extending Across the Forefoot just Proximal to the Metatarsophalangeal Crease)
84.12 - Amputation Through Foot; Amputation of Forefoot; Amputation through Middle of Foot; Choparts Amputation; Midtarsal Amputation; Transmetatarsal Amputation (Amputation of the Forefoot, Including All the Toes)
84.14 - Amputation of Ankle through Malleoli of Tibia and Fibula
84.15 - Amputation below Knee, Other; Amputation of Leg through Tibia and Fibula NOS
84.16 - Disarticulation of Knee; Batch, Spitler, and McFaddin Amputation; Mazet Amputation; S.P. Rogers Amputation
84.17 - Amputation above Knee; Amputation of Leg through Femur; Amputation of Thigh; Conversion of Below-Knee Amputation into Above-Knee Amputation; Supracondylar Above-Knee Amputation
84.18 - Disarticulation of Hip
84.19 - Abdominopelvic Amputation; Hemipelvectomy; Hindquarter Amputation
84.3 - Revision of Amputation Stump; Reamputation of Stump; Secondary Closure of Stump; Trimming of Stump

Overview

Amputation is the calculated surgical removal of all or part of an extremity when its blood supply is irreversibly compromised by disease or severe injury. By contrast, traumatic amputation is the accidental severing of the body part (See Amputation Foot, Traumatic, and Amputation Leg, Traumatic). The same general principles apply to both forms of amputation, especially regarding wound closure, rehabilitation, and use of artificial limbs (prosthetics). The aim is to remove diseased or damaged tissue, relieve pain, and to prepare a site for a prosthesis, helping the individual return to the most comfortable and functional life possible.

Amputations may be performed at any level in the upper extremities such as the digits, the hand, or the arm, or in the lower extremities such as the toes, the foot, or the leg. The point at which the limb or digit is incised and removed is known as the amputation level; surgeons determine the amputation level by measuring blood flow in the area, determining where complete healing is most likely to occur with least risk of complications, and evaluating which level would permit the greatest function and most efficient use of a prosthesis following rehabilitation. Optimum function may be gained when the amputation level is closer to the diseased or damaged part of a limb (distal amputation), while the risk of complications is reduced when the amputation level is higher and a greater portion of the limb is removed (proximal amputation). Amputation levels are referred to by site as upper extremity (UE), above elbow (AE), below elbow (BE), lower extremity (LE), above the knee (AK), below the knee (BK), or through the knee (TK). More recent terminology classes the amputation by the major bone transected, e.g., transtibial means below knee, transradial means below elbow, and transfemoral means above knee.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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