Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Anaphylactic Shock


Related Terms

  • Anaphylactoid Reaction
  • Anaphylaxis
  • Food Reaction
  • Immunologic Reaction
  • Serum Sickness
  • Severe Allergic Reaction

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Allergist/Immunologist
  • Critical Care Internist
  • Emergency Medicine Physician
  • Internal Medicine Physician

Comorbid Conditions

  • Asthma
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Pulmonary insufficiency

Factors Influencing Duration

Duration depends on severity of reaction; individual's age, sensitivity, target organ, and other medical conditions; type and amount of antigen, method of exposure, timing of onset and treatment; workplace assignment; job demands; and response to treatment.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
995.0 - Other Anaphylactic Reaction
995.60 - Anaphylactic Reaction Due to Unspecified Food
995.61 - Anaphylactic Reaction Due to Peanuts
995.62 - Anaphylactic reaction due to crustaceans
995.63 - Anaphylactic Reaction Due to Fruits and Vegetables
995.64 - Anaphylactic reaction due to tree nuts and seeds
995.65 - Anaphylactic reaction due to fish
995.66 - Anaphylactic reaction due to food additives
995.67 - Anaphylactic reaction due to milk products
995.68 - Anaphylactic reaction due to eggs
995.69 - Anaphylactic reaction due to other specified food

Treatment

Anaphylactic shock is an emergency condition requiring immediate professional medical attention. CPR and other lifesaving measures may be required. This may include placing a tube through the nose or mouth into the airway (endotracheal intubation) or emergency surgery to place a tube directly into the trachea (tracheostomy). Epinephrine is given by injection and / or inhalation. This opens the airways and raises the blood pressure by constricting blood vessels.

Treatment for shock includes intravenous fluids and medications that support the actions of the heart and circulatory system. Antihistamines and corticosteroids may be given to further reduce symptoms after lifesaving measures and epinephrine are administered.

Once the individual stabilizes, observation should continue for late reaction symptoms for at least 24 hours after a severe or extreme reaction. Hot showers, baths, and alcohol must be avoided for at least 24 hours to prevent a recurrence of low blood pressure.

A medic alert bracelet should be worn, and individuals should be cautioned after an episode of anaphylaxis to avoid exposure to the inciting agent. When no inciting agent is identified, the individual should be referred to an allergist to identify the cause of anaphylaxis. Individuals with food reactions should refrain from eating in restaurants where the ingredients in dishes cannot be identified.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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