Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Anemia Complicating Pregnancy


Related Terms

  • Folic Acid Deficiency Anemia
  • Iron Deficiency Anemia
  • Macrocytic Anemia
  • Sickle Cell Anemia

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Family Physician
  • Hematologist
  • Obstetrician/Gynecologist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Length of disability may be influenced by the type of anemia, severity of symptoms, and the individual's compliance and response to treatment.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
648.2 - Anemia Complicating Pregnancy
648.20 - Other Current Conditions in the Mother Classifiable Elsewhere, but Complicating Pregnancy, Childbirth, or the Puerperium, Anemia, Unspecified as to Episode of Care or Not Applicable
648.21 - Other Current Conditions in the Mother Classifiable Elsewhere, but Complicating Pregnancy, Childbirth, or the Puerperium, Anemia, Delivered, with or without Mention of Antepartum Condition
648.22 - Other Current Conditions in the Mother Classifiable Elsewhere, but Complicating Pregnancy, Childbirth, or the Puerperium, Anemia, Delivered, with Mention of Postpartum Condition
648.23 - Other Current Conditions in the Mother Classifiable Elsewhere, but Complicating Pregnancy, Childbirth, or the Puerperium, Anemia, Antepartum Condition or Complication
648.24 - Other Current Conditions in the Mother Classifiable Elsewhere, but Complicating Pregnancy, Childbirth, or the Puerperium, Anemia, Postpartum Condition or Complication

Overview

Anemia during pregnancy occurs when there is less than the normal amount of red blood cells circulating in the blood. Although most women experience anemia to some degree during pregnancy, it isn't usually harmful. Anemias resulting from hereditary abnormalities in hemoglobin, however, increase the risk of illness in the pregnant woman and may cause illness and/or even death in the newborn.

The most common anemia of pregnancy is dilutional anemia, which is due to relatively large increases in extracellular fluid volume in comparison to the increase in red blood cell production that occurs as a normal effect of pregnancy. Another type of anemia that can complicate pregnancy is iron deficiency anemia. Because the pregnant woman must produce enough red blood cells to supply the fetus as well as herself, more iron is needed during pregnancy. Although iron deficiency anemia is usually caused by a nutritional deficiency during pregnancy, it can also be the result of a pre-existing iron deficiency condition caused by the loss of iron during menstrual periods, or from a previous pregnancy. Unless nutritional intake of iron is supplemented during pregnancy, the woman will be deficient in iron stores at the time of delivery placing her at risk of requiring a blood transfusion if postpartum bleeding occurs. Anemia during pregnancy can also result from a diet deficient in folic acid, which is the B vitamin needed to produce red blood cells.

An increased risk for developing anemia during pregnancy is associated with women who have several pregnancies relatively close to each other, women carrying more than one fetus (multiple gestation), women who are unable to eat well because of vomiting or nausea, and poor nutrition.

Incidence and Prevalence: Approximately 20% of women are anemic during pregnancy ("Anemia").

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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