Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Appendectomy


Related Terms

  • Excision of Appendix
  • Removal of the Appendix

Specialists

  • General Surgeon

Comorbid Conditions

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Gastrointestinal disorders
  • Hepatic disease
  • Immune system disorders
  • Obesity
  • Renal disease

Factors Influencing Duration

The type of surgery, the surgeon's skill, presence of surgical complications, and condition of the appendix (i.e., intact, abscessed, ruptured) may affect recovery time. Those who perform heavy work may require a longer recovery period than those with more sedentary tasks.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
47.01 - Laparoscopic Appendectomy
47.09 - Appendectomy, Other
47.11 - Laparoscopic Incidental Appendectomy
47.19 - Other Incidental Appendectomy

How Procedure is Performed

Appendectomy is done by a general surgeon as an inpatient surgery under general anesthesia. The surgery may be performed using an open incision or via laparoscopy.

During a traditional open appendectomy, a small incision (McBurney incision) is made in the abdominal wall. The incision is made in the lower right side of the abdomen, in the area over the appendix, and the muscles over the appendix are split or cut. The surgeon then locates the appendix and inspects it. If there are no complications involving the surrounding tissues, the surgeon separates (dissects) the appendix from the abdomen and/or large intestine and then cuts its attachment to the cecum, removing the appendix. The cecum is then closed with sutures. If a pocket of infection (abscess) has formed, it will be cleansed and suctioned away by a special instrument (suction irrigator). A tube also may be inserted into the abdomen to promote drainage from the infected site. The abdominal incision is then closed, and the procedure is complete.

In most cases, surgeons choose a laparoscopic procedure to remove the appendix in which a tiny video camera (laparoscope) is inserted into the abdomen through a very small incision. During the laparoscopic procedure, the surgeon uses the video camera to view the abdominal cavity and its contents. Because abdominal regions can be seen easily, this technique is especially useful when the diagnosis of appendicitis is unclear. Specialized surgical tools that can be inserted through tiny incisions are used to remove the appendix in the same manner as for the conventional open surgical procedure. Although the laparoscopic approach can take longer to perform, the benefits of laparoscopic surgery include less postoperative discomfort and quicker recovery time. In the case of a ruptured or perforated appendix, the open incision method may be preferred because it is associated with fewer incidences of postoperative abdominal abscesses.

With open or laparoscopic appendectomy, if the appendix has ruptured (perforated appendix), the surgeon flushes the spilled material (pus) from the abdomen with sterile warm water, and a drain is inserted and left in place to promote drainage of infected fluids.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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