Sign-in
(your email):
(case sensitive):



 
 

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Arthropathy


Text Only Home | Graphic-Rich Site | Overview | Risk and Causation | Diagnosis | Treatment | Prognosis | Differential Diagnosis | Specialists | Rehabilitation | Comorbid Conditions | Complications | Factors Influencing Duration | Length of Disability | Ability to Work | Maximum Medical Improvement | Failure to Recover | Medical Codes | References

Treatment

Treatment depends upon the specific diagnosis and the underlying cause of joint pain or inflammation. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory oral drugs are used in early and in late stage arthropathy; these drugs have both analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. In some diseases (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis), potent anti-inflammatory medications may be used to reduce the degenerative inflammatory process, and immunosuppressive drugs, disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDS), or biologic therapies may be used to slow the progression of the disease. In other diseases such as osteoarthritis, medication may control symptoms but does not change the progression of the disease. Short-term immobilization using a resting splint or special immobilizing boot may help decrease the speed of joint degeneration in a peripheral joint. Arthropathy may be treated with physical and / or occupational therapy to instruct the individual in stretching and strengthening exercises, as well as in joint protection strategies. Antibiotics may be required to treat arthropathy secondary to underlying infectious arthritis.

Painful spinal joints can be selectively injected with a local anesthetic and an anti-inflammatory corticosteroid to reduce back pain. Similarly, joints in the upper and lower limbs may be injected with an anti-inflammatory corticosteroid, or with hyaluronic acid derivatives to improve joint lubrication. The pain relief from injections is temporary. If effective, the injections can be repeated.

Surgery may be required in cases of severe arthropathy. In the spine, hypertrophic facet arthropathy may require partial facetectomy, decompressive laminectomy, or spinal fusion if spinal nerves are being compressed by new bone formation. Spinal fusion may also be necessary if spinal instability is present. If a joint is unstable, arthrodesis may be necessary using stabilizing hardware (internal fixation) or bone grafting to stabilize the joint and reduce pain. Total joint replacement may be necessary (e.g., total knee or hip replacement) if joint surfaces have been destroyed.

Surgery for total joint replacement has continued to improve. Total hip or knee replacement is common. Total shoulder or elbow replacement is evolving. Total wrist or ankle replacement is less common. Joint replacement of the fingers is common.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor