Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Arthroscopy


Related Terms

  • Arthroscope
  • Endoscope
  • Joint Endoscopy
  • Scope

Specialists

  • Dentist
  • Hand Surgeon
  • Neurosurgeon
  • Oral/Maxillofacial Surgeon
  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

The associated procedure, underlying diagnosis, amount of joint swelling, and postoperative pain affect the disability period. Any complication of the procedure or the underlying condition would add disability time. Some procedures associated with arthroscopy require extensive rehabilitation for recovery. Functional activities and weight bearing may also be restricted for several weeks after surgery, especially in procedures on the lower extremities and shoulders. Even if the arthroscope is used for diagnostic purposes only, there will be temporary stiffness following the procedure.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
80.20 - Arthroscopy, Unspecified Site
80.21 - Arthroscopy, Shoulder
80.22 - Arthroscopy, Elbow
80.23 - Arthroscopy, Wrist
80.24 - Arthroscopy, Hand and Finger
80.25 - Arthroscopy, Hip
80.26 - Arthroscopy, Knee
80.27 - Arthroscopy, Ankle
80.28 - Arthroscopy, Foot and Toe
80.29 - Arthroscopy, Other Specified Sites

Overview

© Reed Group
Arthroscopy literally means "looking into a joint." The procedure involves making a small incision near the joint and inserting a thin, optic tube to see into the joint. Today, most arthroscopes are fitted with a camera that allows the surgeon to view the joint on a video monitor (TV) and that provides for video recording and printing pictures. This technology is different than endoscopy which is used to look inside the body in hollow organs or cavities. Endoscopy uses a thin, flexible, fiberoptic tube for viewing.

A common misconception is that the arthroscope is a tool used to perform surgery. The "scope" is used only for visualization; other small instruments must be inserted into the joint through additional small incisions to actually perform the surgery. To allow visualization and performance of procedures, fluid (irrigation) must be infused into the joint to expand the joint space and help clear debris. Special solutions are used, depending on the joint being examined and the associated procedure to be performed. This procedure requires two or more small incisions to allow for the insertion of the arthroscope, the irrigation fluid, and the surgical instruments. A special tube (cannula) can be used to accommodate all the equipment necessary to perform the arthroscopy and associated surgical procedure. Sometimes this fluid leaks into the surrounding soft tissue causing extravasation and edema.

Any joint can be examined using the arthroscope, but the most common are the knee and shoulder. Other joints include the elbow, wrist, hip, ankle, temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and spine. Arthroscopy has proven an invaluable adjunct to the diagnostic images obtained from x-ray, CT, MRI, or arthrography and often confirms the diagnosis. Procedures that occur during arthroscopy range from the removal of loose joint cartilage to major reconstructive procedures.

The use of arthroscopic-assisted techniques for many surgical procedures has gained wide acceptance by both patients and physicians. The decision to use this technique will be based on surgical experience, the availability of specialized equipment with well-trained staff, and agreement between physician and patient. Injuries, diseases, or conditions affecting joints could be appropriate choices for arthroscopic examination and arthroscopically assisted surgical procedures.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Reason for Procedure

Arthroscopy was initially used to confirm diagnoses, but as equipment and training have increased, the opportunity to include surgical techniques has developed. For example, arthroscopy can be used as a diagnostic tool to further define conditions such as unexplained joint pain, bone fragments, suspected meniscal or ligament damage, joint disease, or lesions presented on x-ray. It may also assist in following the progress of a joint procedure and in obtaining the correct tissue during a biopsy. Arthroscopic-assisted surgery may allow for less soft tissue damage than an open procedure, decrease postoperative pain, and shorten hospital stays. Under direct visualization, structures can be palpated, probed, removed, irrigated, repaired, debrided, or abraded. Associated procedures are often scheduled as diagnostic arthroscopy with a "possible [named] procedure" to follow.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



How Procedure is Performed

Through small skin incisions, the joint capsule is first expanded with fluid passed into and out of the joint capsule via small tubes. The fluid pressure is maintained either by pumps or gravity. Draining the fluid clears the visual field of blood and debris created during surgery. The arthroscope is introduced into the joint capsule and then, most commonly, attached to a video monitor. Surgical instruments used to cut, scrape, or remove tissue are inserted through another hole (portal) in the skin. Depending on the procedure, tissue may also be repaired. Orthopedic hardware may be inserted or removed, holes drilled, and fixation verified. Again, the arthroscope is used only to look into the joint; the actual surgical procedure is done with other instruments. The surgical procedure may require additional small incisions (portals) through which various instruments are passed.

Arthroscopy may be performed under local, regional, or general anesthesia. The procedure is done in ambulatory surgical centers, outpatient facilities, occasionally during inpatient hospital stays, and rarely in physician's offices. The type of anesthesia and location of the surgery depends on the surgeon's, anesthesiologist's, and individual's preferences; the physical condition of the individual; and any expected associated procedures.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Prognosis

Clinical conditions being treated during an arthroscopic procedure dictate the possible outcome and vary tremendously. Anticipated results will vary from reduction of symptoms to relief of pain. It is important for both the individual and physician to understand the goal of arthroscopy and the expected outcome before proceeding with the surgery.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation is dependent on the condition being treated and the procedure being performed. Please view specific conditions or diagnoses for additional details.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Complications

Complications from arthroscopic procedures include infection, nerve damage, extravasation and edema of the irrigation fluid, blood vessel damage, tissue perforation, ligament and muscle tears, and compartment syndrome (especially if a tourniquet was used on an extremity).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

Restrictions and accommodations depend on the underlying diagnosis, treatment, and outcome. Following testing alone, the individual will experience joint stiffness for a few days. Excessive use of the affected area during this time is potentially difficult due to transient joint swelling and stiffness, so the individual is discouraged from resuming normal activity until the joint has had time to heal.

Risk: Risk is dependent of the condition or diagnosis. Decisions about safe and appropriate return to work require knowledge of the specific condition treated by arthroscopy.

Capacity: Capacity will vary depending on the condition or diagnosis. For example, a shoulder with a rotator cuff tear after arthroscopic repair will require a period of limited hand over shoulder activities. Again, please view specific diagnoses for additional details regarding capacity.

Tolerance: Tolerance for joint pain (which is often treated by arthroscopic) is a frequent reason people choose to do, or not to do, specific activities, considering the rewards (such as salary or fun) versus the cost (such as pain or inconvenience).

Accommodations: See specific diagnoses for examples of appropriate accommodations.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Maximum Medical Improvement

Arthroscopy is a diagnostic procedure and thus would have no change in baseline status due to the procedure. Therefore, the patient would be at MMI within 1 day.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



References

Cited

"Arthroscopy." WebMD.com. 7 Jan. 2011. WebMD, LLC. 26 Mar. 2013 <http://arthritis.webmd.com/arthroscopy-surgical-procedure>.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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