Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Ascites


Related Terms

  • Hydroperitoneum

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Gastroenterologist
  • Internal Medicine Physician

Comorbid Conditions

  • Cancer
  • Heart failure
  • Kidney failure
  • Liver failure
  • Respiratory failure

Factors Influencing Duration

The underlying disease process is the key factor in determining the course and length of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
789.5 - Ascites
789.51 - Malignant ascites
789.59 - Other ascites

Failure to Recover

If an individual fails to recover within the expected maximum duration period, the reader may wish to consider the following questions to better understand the specifics of an individual's medical case.

Regarding diagnosis:

  • Was there evidence of portal hypertension?
  • Does individual have an abdominal or ovarian tumor?
  • Does individual have tuberculosis that has infected the peritoneum?
  • Was individual on dialysis? Have nephrotic syndrome? Chronic glomerulonephritis?
  • Was there inflammation of the pancreas or gallbladder?
  • Does individual have severe hypothyroidism?
  • Was there sudden weight gain? Belt or clothes suddenly too tight?
  • Does individual complain of generalized, constant, abdominal discomfort or pain?
  • Was there a history of chronic illness such as hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, congestive heart failure, or kidney failure?
  • Does individual have difficulty breathing especially when lying down?
  • On exam, was individual's abdomen distended? Firm? Was a fluid wave present?
  • Are the veins of the abdominal wall distended? Is jaundice present? Spider angiomata?
  • Do individual's palms appear red or liver-colored?
  • Does individual look pale? Have thin extremities? Rapid respirations? Were the neck veins distended? Was there fever? Enlarged lymph nodes?
  • Was generalized swelling (anasarca) present?
  • Was abdominal ultrasound performed? CT? Was a paracentesis done and fluid analyzed? Was blood work, including CBC, liver enzymes, amylase, BUN, and blood creatinine, done?
  • Were conditions with similar symptoms ruled out?

Regarding treatment:

  • What is the underlying cause of the ascites? Is it being treated?
  • Were diuretics used in an attempt to drain the fluid? Was a therapeutic paracentesis done?
  • Has peritoneovenous shunting been considered? A transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS)?
  • Is individual a candidate for a liver transplant?

Regarding prognosis:

  • Can individual's employer accommodate any necessary restrictions?
  • Does individual have any conditions that may affect ability to recover?
  • Have any complications developed such as bacterial peritonitis, hydrothorax, or abdominal wall hernia?

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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