Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Aspiration


Related Terms

  • Arthrocentesis
  • Culdocentesis
  • Diagnostic Peritoneal Lavage
  • Fine Needle Aspiration
  • Lumbar Puncture
  • Paracentesis
  • Pericardiocentesis
  • Spinal Tap
  • Thoracentesis

Specialists

  • Emergency Medicine Physician
  • General Surgeon

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Aspiration is not associated with a period of disability. If complications arise, the period of disability is related to the type of complication, severity of symptoms, and individual's response to treatment.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
03.31 - Spinal Tap; Lumbar Puncture for Removal of Dye
06.01 - Aspiration of Thyroid Field; Percutaneous or Needle Drainage of Thyroid Field
12.21 - Diagnostic Aspiration of Anterior Chamber of Eye
13.3 - Extracapsular Extraction of Lens by Simple Aspiration (and Irrigation) Technique; Irrigation of Traumatic Cataract
14.11 - Diagnostic Aspiration of Vitreous
16.22 - Diagnostic Aspiration of Orbit
22.00 - Aspiration and Lavage of Nasal Sinus, Not Otherwise Specified
22.01 - Puncture of Nasal Sinus for Aspiration or Lavage
22.02 - Aspiration or Lavage of Nasal Sinus through Natural Ostium
41.32 - Closed (Aspiration) (Percutaneous) Biopsy of Spleen
41.91 - Aspiration of Bone Marrow From Donor for Transplant
50.91 - Percutaneous Aspiration of Liver
51.01 - Percutaneous Aspiration of Gallbladder; Percutaneous cholecystotomy for Drainage; That by: Needle or Catheter
52.11 - Closed (Aspiration) (Needle) (Percutaneous) Biopsy of Pancreas
54.91 - Percutaneous Abdominal Drainage; Paracentesis
57.11 - Percutaneous Aspiration of Bladder
60.71 - Percutaneous Aspiration of Seminal Vesicle
60.91 - Percutaneous Aspiration of Prostate
61.91 - Percutaneous Aspiration of Tunica Vaginalis; Aspiration of Hydrocele of Tunica Vaginalis
62.91 - Aspiration of Testis
63.91 - Aspiration of Spermatocele
65.11 - Aspiration Biopsy of Ovary
65.91 - Aspiration of Ovary
66.91 - Aspiration of Fallopian Tube
71.21 - Percutaneous Aspiration of Bartholins Gland (Cyst)
81.91 - Arthrocentesis; Joint Aspiration
83.94 - Aspiration of Bursa
83.95 - Aspiration of Other Soft Tissue
85.91 - Aspiration of Breast
86.01 - Aspiration of Skin and Subcutaneous Tissues

Overview

Aspiration is a procedure where fluid is suctioned out of a body cavity with a device called an aspirator. The aspirator is often a needle and syringe but can also be a siphon, rubber tubing, rubber bulb, or pump.

An abnormal amount of fluid can sometimes collect in a place where it should not such as the chest cavity. Abnormal fluid collection often signals an underlying illness. Part of the treatment for the underlying illness may include removal of the collected fluid (aspiration). Depending on the location of the fluid, aspiration has different names. For example, removal of fluid from the chest cavity is called thoracentesis and removal from the joints is called arthrocentesis.

Aspiration may also be used to diagnose an illness. For example, several diseases (e.g., meningitis, encephalitis, bleeding in the brain [brain hemorrhage], or poliomyelitis) can result in changes in the normal composition of the fluid within the spinal column (cerebrospinal fluid). If one of these diseases is suspected, aspiration of the cerebrospinal fluid may be performed and the fluid analyzed in the laboratory. Aspiration of fluid is commonly performed to check for the presence of bacteria that signals an underlying infection.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Reason for Procedure

Aspiration is performed to remove an abnormal collection of fluid in treating a condition or to remove a sample of fluid or tissue for examination.

Accumulations of fluid in the chest cavity, abdominal cavity, joint spaces, or soft tissues are commonly aspirated for diagnosis or treatment. This fluid may be an excess of normal fluid or an abnormal fluid (pus, inflammatory fluid, blood) that needs to be removed.

In some cases, normally present fluid such as spinal fluid or tissue such as bone marrow is aspirated so a sample can be collected for evaluation and is often done when attempting to diagnose an illness.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



How Procedure is Performed

The specifics of the procedure vary depending on the site of aspiration. In general, the skin over the site of aspiration is sterilized usually with a liquid iodine solution. A local anesthetic is then injected into the skin. The suctioning device (aspirator) is inserted into the fluid or tissue being collected. Using suction, the aspirator removes the desired amount of fluid or tissue that is collected in a sterile receptacle. The aspirator is removed and a bandage or other sterile dressing placed over the entry site.

Aspiration is usually an outpatient procedure unless the underlying condition is severe enough to warrant hospitalization.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Prognosis

Aspiration is a very effective method for obtaining fluid samples and/or draining abnormally collected fluid from a body cavity. Full recovery following this procedure is expected. The prognosis for the underlying condition varies.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Complications

Complications may vary depending on the site of aspiration but in general include bruising at the insertion point, bleeding, and infection. Aspirations of the chest cavity can be associated with a collapsed lung. Aspirations of the abdominal cavity rarely result in injury to the intestines or other organs.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

Restrictions and accommodations are not associated with this procedure.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



References

General

Fortunato Phillips, Nancymarie. Berry and Kohn's Operating Room Technique. 9th ed. St. Louis: Mosby, Inc., 2000.

Moore, Gerald F. "Arthrocentesis Technique and Intraarticular Therapy." Arthritis and Allied Conditions. Ed. William J. Koopman. 14th ed. 1 vols. Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2001. 848-859.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






Feedback
Send us comments, suggestions, corrections, or anything you would like us to hear. If you are not logged in, you must include your email address, in order for us to respond. We cannot, unfortunately, respond to every comment. If you are seeking medical advice, please contact your physician. Thank you!
Send this comment to:
Sales Customer Support Content Development
 
This publication is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. It is published with the understanding that the author, editors, and publisher are not engaged in rendering medical, legal, accounting or other professional service. If medical, legal, or other expert assistance is required, the service of a competent professional should be sought. We are unable to respond to requests for advice. Any Sales inquiries should include an email address or other means of communication.