Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Bone Marrow or Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant


Related Terms

  • Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplant
  • Allogeneic Bone Transplant
  • Auto Bone Marrow Transplant Without Purging
  • Autologous Bone Marrow Transplant
  • Bone Marrow Transplant
  • Stem Cell Transplantation
  • Syngeneic Bone Marrow Transplant
  • Unrelated Donor Bone Marrow Transplant

Specialists

  • Hematologist
  • Immunologist
  • Oncologist

Comorbid Conditions

  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Endocrine disorders
  • Liver disease
  • Pulmonary dysfunction
  • Renal disease
  • Respiratory disorders

Factors Influencing Duration

Factors that may influence length of disability include the underlying reason for the hematopoeitic stem cell transplant, availability of a matching donor, an individual's potential to reject the transplant, development of complications, time in remission preceding the transplant, and use of maintenance chemotherapy for the underlying condition.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
41.0 - Bone Marrow or Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant
41.00 - Bone Marrow Transplant, Not Otherwise Specified
41.01 - Bone Marrow Transplant, Autologous, without Purging
41.02 - Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplant with Purging; Allograft of Bone Marrow with In Vitro Removal (Purging) of T-cells
41.03 - Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplant without Purging; Allograft of Bone Marrow NOS
41.04 - Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant without Purging
41.05 - Allogeneic Hematopoeitic Stem Cell Transplant without Purging
41.06 - Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplant
41.07 - Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant with Purging; Cell Depletion
41.08 - Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant with Purging; Cell Depletion
41.09 - Autologous Bone Marrow Transplant with Purging
41.9 - Other Operations on Spleen and Bone Marrow
41.91 - Aspiration of Bone Marrow From Donor for Transplant
V42.4 - Organ or Tissue Replaced by Transplant, Bone
V42.81 - Organ or Tissue Replaced by Transplant, Bone Marrow

Overview

Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation refers to a group of procedures which collect stem cells from an individual donor and administers them to an individual with defective bone marrow or immune system. Stem cells are immature cells that are produced in the bone marrow and circulate in small concentrations in the blood. Stem cells are the precursor to white blood cells for immune function, oxygen-carrying red blood cells (erythrocytes), and platelets which facilitate clot formation. In the early 1960's the collection of donor stem cells was done exclusively from the donor's bone marrow, hence the procedure was referred to as bone marrow transplant. Over recent years, advances in medicine have allowed for successful collection and transplantation from bone marrow as well as other sources, such as peripheral blood or placental blood. Consequently the procedure is now generally referred to as "stem cell transplantation" or "hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT)." This term is used universally to describe any transplantation of the stem cells, regardless of the donor source.

Four types of hematopoeitic stem cell transplants exist. These include autologous, in which the individual's own stem cells are removed, processed and then returned to the body. A syngeneic transplant refers to transplants in which the donor is an identical twin of the recipient. These transplants are most desirable since the donor marrow and recipient marrow are perfectly matched thus preventing the complication of post-transplant rejection. When the donor is a sibling or parent of the recipient, the transplant is referred to as allogenic. Finally, unrelated donor transplants are those transplants in which the donors are unrelated and have no genetic likeness to the recipient. These donors often require extensive screening, genetic typing and blood typing prior to the transplant procedure to ensure the closest match to the recipient.

Hematopoeitic stem cell transplant were originally performed in the late 1960's for the treatment of certain disorders of the bone marrow such as leukemia, aplastic anemia, Hodgkin's disease and multiple myeloma. More recently, this procedure has been used to help restore the immune system in those with immune deficiency disorders and certain individual's with cancer who have undergone intense chemotherapy treatment.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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