Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Bone Spur


Related Terms

  • Osteophyte

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon
  • Physiatrist (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist)
  • Physical Therapist
  • Sports Medicine Physician

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Factors influencing length of disability include the severity of pain associated with the bone spur, the method of treatment (conservative or surgical), the individual's response to treatment and adherence to recommendations, and the individual's job requirements and leisure activities.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
721.8 - Other Allied Disorders of Spine
726.30 - Enthesopathy of Elbow, Unspecified
726.5 - Enthesopathy of Hip Region; Bursitis of Hip; Gluteal Tendinitis; Iliac Crest Spur; Psoas Tendinitis; Trochanteric Tendinitis
726.60 - Enthesopathy of knee, Unspecified; Bursitis of Knee NOS
726.70 - Enthesopathy of Ankle and Tarsus, Unspecified; Metatarsalgia, NOS
726.73 - Heel Spur; Calcaneal Spur
726.91 - Exostosis of Unspecified Site; Bone Spur

Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation for bone spurs depends on the location of the bone spur as well as the extent of the condition. Individuals with bone spurs may require outpatient physical therapy to address pain and swelling, whether or not surgery is anticipated.

The primary focus of rehabilitation is to reduce the pain associated with the spur. This can be achieved by reducing pressure on the surrounding tissue and using modalities involving heat, cold, and ultrasound as appropriate. For symptomatic spinal osteophytes causing nerve root compression, the therapist will loosen (mobilize) stiff vertebral joints, educate individuals about improving posture and body mechanics, and initiate an exercise program to restore spinal flexibility and strength.

With heel bone spurs, the therapist will reduce the pressure on the spur through activity modification and/or use of orthotics, such as heel cushions. Night splints have not been shown to reduce the pain associated with bone spurs on the heel, although they can be useful to maintain a stretch on tight plantar fascial tissues (Beyzadeoglu).

With shoulder bone spurs, the therapist focuses on improving the individual's biomechanics with reaching activities, performing joint mobilization to restore normal joint mechanics, and instructing the individual in a stretching and strengthening program to reduce muscular imbalances in the involved area.

In addition to undergoing supervised rehabilitation, the individual should be instructed in a home exercise program to be practiced daily and continued independently under a physician's supervision after the completion of rehabilitation.

FREQUENCY OF REHABILITATION VISITS
Nonsurgical
SpecialistBone Spur
Physical TherapistUp to 12 visits within 6 weeks
The table above represents a range of the usual acceptable number of visits for uncomplicated cases. It provides a framework based on the duration of tissue healing time and standard clinical practice.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






Feedback
Send us comments, suggestions, corrections, or anything you would like us to hear. If you are not logged in, you must include your email address, in order for us to respond. We cannot, unfortunately, respond to every comment. If you are seeking medical advice, please contact your physician. Thank you!
Send this comment to:
Sales Customer Support Content Development
 
This publication is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. It is published with the understanding that the author, editors, and publisher are not engaged in rendering medical, legal, accounting or other professional service. If medical, legal, or other expert assistance is required, the service of a competent professional should be sought. We are unable to respond to requests for advice. Any Sales inquiries should include an email address or other means of communication.