Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Cardiac Pacemaker Insertion


Related Terms

  • Atrial Overdrive Pacing
  • Demand Pacemaker
  • Fixed Rate Pacemaker
  • Permanent Pacemaker
  • Temporary Pacemaker
  • Transvenous Pacemaker

Specialists

  • Cardiovascular Internist
  • Emergency Medicine Physician
  • Thoracic Surgeon

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

The individual's age, type of surgical procedure, and any complications may influence the length of disability. In some cases, pacemaker implantation is done on an outpatient basis and requires only a few days of recovery. If the pacemaker was inserted to treat heart rhythm disturbances secondary to a heart attack or open heart surgery, the length of recovery is longer.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
37.80 - Insertion of Permanent Pacemaker, Initial or Replacement , Type of Device Not Specified
37.82 - Initial Insertion of a Single-chamber Device, Rate Responsive; Rate Responsive to Physiological Stimuli Other Than Atrial Rate
37.83 - Initial Insertion of Dual-chamber Device; Atrial Ventricular Sequential Device
37.86 - Pacemaker Insertion, Replacement of Any Type Pacemaker Device with Single-chamber Device, Rate Responsive; Rate Responsive to Physiological Stimuli Other Than Atrial Rate
37.87 - Pacemaker Insertion, Replacement of Any Type Pacemaker Device with Dual-chamber Device; Atrial Ventricular Sequential Device

Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

Strenuous activity, including lifting, carrying, pulling, and pushing objects over 10 pounds, reaching or stretching above the head, and sudden, jerky arm movements, is restricted. Other restrictions apply to workplace use of powerful electromagnetic pulses that might interfere with the operation of the pacemaker. Sources include strong magnetic fields, electrical cables carrying more than 10,000 amperes of current, alternating welding currents, powerful radio transmitters, TV and radar transmitters, power tools and assembly line robots, induction furnaces, and electric generating plants or substations. Digital cellular telephones and antitheft devices also have the potential to interfere with pacemakers. Until further tests have been conducted, individuals with pacemakers should turn off mobile phones when they are in a breast pocket, hold the phone at least 10 to 12 inches from the pacemaker when using it, use the phone on the ear opposite to the implant, and try to stay away from electronic surveillance equipment. When in doubt, employers should consult with the individual's doctor regarding appropriate work restrictions and accommodations.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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