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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Cardiomyopathy


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Prognosis

Morbidity and mortality vary widely and are related to the cause and severity of a given cardiomyopathy and the age and general health status of the individual. Regardless of its cause, the natural history of cardiomyopathy may be short, with death occurring within several months to 2 years. The clinical course may also be relatively stable and surprisingly long in some individuals who respond to therapy. Long-term studies show that survival is proportional to disease severity at diagnosis.

The annual mortality rate of individuals with dilated cardiomyopathy is 20% in those with moderate heart failure and can be as high as 50% in those with severe heart failure (Ferri; Okutucu). The risk of death varies greatly with the presence or absence of comorbidity. Accounting for one’s comorbidities and risk profile can enhance the accurate prediction of survival (Pocock; Okutucu)

Young individuals with a recent onset of dilated cardiomyopathy generally have a good outcome, because of either successful drug therapy or spontaneous reversal of the cardiomyopathy. It is possible, however, that some individuals, particularly those who are older, will not respond to the medication and may require a heart transplant.

Individuals with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy often have a poor prognosis because drug treatment is generally unsuccessful unless surgery is performed to remove excess myocardial tissue in the interventricular septum (septal myomectomy). The annual mortality rate of all individuals with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is 1% to 2% (Ferri). The mortality rate among non-infant pediatric patients is about 1% per year. The 1-year survival rate for in infants younger than 1 year old is 85.8% (Colan). It is the most common cause of sudden death among young adults (Maron). In all who suffer from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, sudden death is a possible outcome, usually from ventricular fibrillation occurring without warning (Maron).

Restrictive cardiomyopathy does not often respond to treatment, and the outcome generally is poor (Ammash).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor