Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Cerebral Palsy


Related Terms

  • Dyskinetic Cerebral Palsy
  • Spastic Cerebral Palsy

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Clinical Psychologist
  • Neurologist
  • Neurosurgeon
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon
  • Otolaryngologist
  • Physiatrist (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist)
  • Physical Therapist
  • Psychiatrist

Comorbid Conditions

  • Deformities of the limbs
  • Epilepsy
  • Obesity

Factors Influencing Duration

The type and severity of cerebral palsy, the individual's emotional adjustment to the disability, and the availability of work accommodations will all influence the individual's ability to work.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
343.9 - Cerebral Palsy, Unspecified; Cerebral Palsy NOS

Diagnosis

History: Cerebral palsy is difficult to recognize and diagnose in early infancy but is easy to recognize in children and adults. Early signs of cerebral palsy usually appear before the age of three. A careful history of possible prenatal, perinatal, or postnatal injuries to the developing nervous system should be obtained from the family. Symptoms include difficulty with fine motor skills, such as writing, difficulty with balance and walking, and involuntary movements.

Physical exam: Motor abnormalities that have their onset early in life and continue through adulthood are numerous and diverse. The individual usually has slow motor development, overactive or overresponsive reflexes (hyperreflexia), and altered muscle tone (hypertonia and/or hypotonia). Individuals with hemiparesis have increased tone in the limbs and develop a characteristic gait and posture. Walking may seem normal, but the abnormality is apparent when the individual runs. Tendon reflexes are increased on the affected side, and spasticity and clonus may be present. In quadriparesis, both cerebral hemispheres are involved, and speech impairment, drooling, and difficulty swallowing (dysphagia) develop. Fine motor skills, including rapid hand movements and asymmetric forearm function, and reflexes should be tested. In dyskinetic cerebral palsy, there is enlargement (hypertrophy) of the continually moving muscles, especially of the neck and shoulders.

Tests: Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and electroencephalography (EEG) are often used in the diagnosis. Laboratory testing of blood and cerebrospinal fluid will help distinguish cerebral palsy from meningitis and metabolic disorders causing similar symptoms.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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