Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Cervical Polyps


Related Terms

  • Mucous Polyp of Cervix

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Gynecologist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Factors influencing length of disability include the severity of symptoms, number of polyps, and the individual's response to treatment.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
622.7 - Cervical Polyps

Overview

A cervical polyp is a growth arising from the mucosal surface on the lower end of the uterus (cervix) or the endocervical canal. These small growths hang from a stalk and protrude through the cervical opening. They are typically non-cancerous (benign), but are usually removed because they can become infected, may cause irregular bleeding and/or bleeding after sexual intercourse and in rare cases, may become cancerous.

Cervical polyps may be the result of infection and may be linked to chronic inflammation, an abnormal response to increased levels of estrogen, or local congestion of cervical vessels.

Cervical polyps are rarely seen prior to the onset of menstrual periods (menarche). In most cases, only one polyp is found.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Causation and Known Risk Factors

Cervical polyps are commonly found in women over age 20 or who have had at least one child.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Diagnosis

History: Women may complain of spotty vaginal bleeding in the form of a pink discharge containing mucous or pus, or a white or yellow colored mucous discharge (leukorrhea). The spotting may occur between periods, after douching, after straining to have a bowel movement, or after sexual intercourse; women who have gone through menopause may report bleeding. Some women may experience abnormally heavy periods (menorrhagia), while others do not experience any symptoms.

Physical exam: Cervical polyps are usually felt during a routine pelvic examination and often appear as smooth, red or purple, finger-like projections protruding from the cervical canal.

Tests: A pap smear test is performed during the physical exam to detect any precancerous changes in the surface layer of the cervical cells (dysplasia). A cervical biopsy is usually done and it typically reveals mildly abnormal cells and signs of infection.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Treatment

Removal of most cervical polyps is done as a simple outpatient procedure. Gentle, manual twisting of a cervical polyp with a clamp is typically enough to remove it; however, a polyp is often removed by tying a surgical thread around its base and cutting it off. Removing the base can be done either by electrocauterization or laser surgery; there may be some light bleeding after this procedure. If the polyp is large or if the cervix is dilated or soft, the cervix may be dilated more and the polyp scraped off (dilation and curettage, or D&C); the uterus is then explored for signs of more polyps. Once removed, polyp regrowth is uncommon.

Although most cervical polyps are benign, the removed tissue is sent to a pathologist for microscopic examination. Antibiotics are given as preventive measure against infection (prophylactically).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Prognosis

Complete recovery is expected from uncomplicated polyp removal. Regrowth is uncommon.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Complications

Complications are directly related to the number and size of the polyps and the method of treatment. Cervical polyps are generally considered to be infected and, after their removal, the infection can spread to the uterus. If a D&C is required, complications from that procedure include damage and scarring of the cervix and uterus, and, rarely, perforation of the uterus. Occasionally a cervical polyp will be located high in the cervix, making it hard to see; polyps in this location have been known to cause infertility. Some types of cervical cancers may first appear as a small polyp.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

Depending on the symptoms and method of treatment, work responsibilities may need to be adjusted for a short time to avoid heavy lifting and extended periods of standing.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Failure to Recover

If an individual fails to recover within the expected maximum duration period, the reader may wish to consider the following questions to better understand the specifics of an individual's medical case.

Regarding diagnosis:

  • Does individual have chronic cervical inflammation, increased levels of estrogen, or local congestion of cervical blood vessels?
  • How many children does individual have?
  • Does individual complain of spotty vaginal bleeding in the form of a pink discharge containing mucous or pus, or a white or yellow colored mucous discharge (leukorrhea)?
  • Does individual's spotting occur between periods? After sexual intercourse? Does individual report spotting after douching or straining to have a bowel movement? Does individual experience abnormally heavy periods (menorrhagia)?
  • Was a pelvic examination done? Were smooth, red or purple, finger-like projections protruding from the cervical canal present?
  • Has individual had a Pap smear? A cervical biopsy?
  • Were conditions with similar symptoms ruled out?

Regarding treatment:

  • Was individual's cervical polyp removed? Was it sent to the pathologist?
  • Is individual being treated with antibiotics?

Regarding prognosis:

  • Can individual's employer accommodate any necessary restrictions?
  • Does individual have any conditions that may affect ability to recover?
  • Have any complications developed such as uterine infection, damage and scarring of the cervix and uterus, perforation of the uterus, infertility, or cervical cancer?

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



References

General

Chen, Peter, ed. "Cervical Polyps." MedlinePlus. Ed. Peter Chen. 2 May. 2005. National Library of Medicine. 19 May 2005 <http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001494.htm>.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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