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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Coarctation of the Aorta


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Prognosis

With coarctation of the aorta, although untreated individuals may survive to the age of 35, fewer than 20% will reach the age of 50 (Shah). Early repair of coarctation (before age 14) is associated with a 20-year survival rate of 91%; however, if coarctation is repaired after age 14, the 20-year survival rate decreases to 79% (Shah). Most develop high blood pressure during childhood and failure of the left side of the heart (left ventricular failure) in their fifties. Death is usually caused by rupture or dissection of the aorta, bleeding into the brain (cerebral hemorrhage), infection involving the arteries (infective endarteritis) or the heart (infective endocarditis), heart failure, coronary artery disease, or coexisting disease of the aortic valve.

In some cases, coarctation of the aorta is curable with surgery, and rapid improvement of symptoms can be expected after the repair. High blood pressure resolves in about half of individuals. Death during the procedure is rare.

In other cases, surgery does not cure all of the problems associated with the disorder. For instance, many individuals continue to have high blood pressure after the defect is surgically repaired. Although the high blood pressure resolves after a few weeks following surgery in some cases, close monitoring, including exercise testing and medication is required to keep blood pressure at a safe level. Many individuals continue to have high blood pressure requiring medication to control it throughout their lifetime.

Overall, there is an earlier incidence of death among individuals with aortic repair than among the general public. However, repair leads to a marked increase in longevity over those individuals who do not opt for the repair. Today, diagnosis of a coarctation and the subsequent repair typically occur during infancy.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor