Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Compartment Syndrome


Related Terms

  • Capillary Perfusion Pressure
  • Compartmental Syndrome
  • CPP
  • Intercompartmental Pressure
  • Volkmann’s Contracture

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

Comorbid Conditions

  • Abdominal trauma
  • Blood clots
  • Blood vessel injuries
  • Cellulitis
  • Gas gangrene
  • Internal bleeding
  • Kidney disease
  • Liver transplantation

Factors Influencing Duration

Factors that may influence the length of disability include promptness and extent of treatment, any complications, and the response of the individual. For compartment syndrome of the hand, duration depends on whether the dominant or nondominant hand was affected.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
729.71 - Nontraumatic Compartment Syndrome of Upper Extremity; Nontraumatic Compartment Syndrome of Shoulder, Arm, Forearm, Wrist, Hand and Fingers
729.72 - Nontraumatic Compartment Syndrome of Lower Extremity; Nontraumatic Compartment Syndrome of Hip, Buttock, Thigh, Leg, Foot and Toes
729.73 - Nontraumatic Compartment Syndrome of Abdomen
958.90 - Certain Early Trauma Complications, Traumatic Compartment Syndrome, Unspecified
958.91 - Certain Early Trauma Complications, Traumatic Compartment Syndrome of Upper Extremity
958.92 - Certain Early Trauma Complications, Traumatic Compartment Syndrome of Lower Extremity
958.93 - Certain Early Trauma Complications, Traumatic Compartment Syndrome of Abdomen
958.99 - Certain Early Trauma Complications, Traumatic Compartment Syndrome of Other Sites

Rehabilitation

The rehabilitation program for compartment syndrome will depend on what caused the condition. It is important to identify the underlying etiology. CS may result from an acute trauma or an offending activity, such as running or skiing (Brennan, Kleigman). If the cause is activity-related and not acute, the individual should be instructed in activity modifications so as to reduce the factors associated with CS (Yeung; Kliegman). If the CS occurred in the lower extremities, the feet should be assessed for pronation and treated with orthotic shoe inserts; shock absorbing insoles may also be recommended (Barr).

If CS results from an acute trauma, then surgery is usually indicated, followed by rehabilitation. Rehabilitation depends on the integrity and vascularity of the released muscle and surrounding soft tissue. When indicated, therapy begins with gentle active range of motion exercise of the adjacent joints. During this stage, exercise must be taught and progressed gradually so as not to compromise the healing of the soft tissue. Gait training with an assistive device may be necessary following lower extremity surgical release, with the amount of weight bearing as indicated by the treating surgeon. Once the soft tissue is healed and the wound is closed, therapy continues with progressive stretching exercises and advances to strengthening exercises (Hovius).

If the CS is chronic, then conservative treatment may be beneficial. If the offending activity leading to the symptoms can be identified, it should be modified or discontinued. This treatment should follow the principles of PRICE (protection, rest, ice, compression, elevation) until swelling is controlled (Barr; Kliegman). Exercise should begin with gentle active range of motion exercises. As soon as symptoms subside, therapy should progress with stretching and strengthening exercises until full function returns. Therapists should always carefully monitor signs or symptoms of recurrence in these individuals as they progress through rehabilitation. Surgery (fasciotomy) may be necessary if conservative therapy fails.

Additional information may provide insight into the rehabilitation needs of these individuals (Pell).

FREQUENCY OF REHABILITATION VISITS
Nonsurgical
SpecialistCompartment Syndrome
Occupational / Hand / Physical TherapistUp to 6 visits within 6 weeks
Surgical
SpecialistCompartment Syndrome
Occupational / Hand / Physical TherapistUp to 15 visits within 6 weeks
Note on Nonsurgical Guidelines: Applies to chronic compartment syndrome.
The table above represents a range of the usual acceptable number of visits for uncomplicated cases. It provides a framework based on the duration of tissue healing time and standard clinical practice.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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