Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Contusion, Eye


Related Terms

  • Black Eye
  • Blunt Trauma
  • Ecchymosis
  • Lid Contusion

Differential Diagnosis

  • Abrasions and lacerations of the eyelids
  • Corneal abrasions
  • Foreign bodies on the surface of or within the eye
  • Fracture of facial bones, eye socket, or the skull bone near the eye
  • Hyphema
  • Lacerations of the anterior segment, cornea or sclera
  • Rupture of the globe

Specialists

  • Emergency Medicine Physician
  • Family Physician
  • Ophthalmologist

Comorbid Conditions

  • Bleeding disorders (e.g., hemophilia)
  • Other lacerations or fractures

Factors Influencing Duration

Black eyes are rarely disabling. Complications or associated injuries might influence the length of disability, particularly if surgery is required.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
921.0 - Black Eye, Not Otherwise Specified
921.1 - Contusion of Eyelids and Periocular Area
921.2 - Contusion of Orbital Tissues
921.3 - Contusion of Eyeball
921.9 - Contusion of Eye, Unspecified

Treatment

For minor injuries, the eyelid and area surrounding the eye is gently washed with mild soap and water. If there are abrasions or lacerations of the lids, foreign bodies on the surface of the eye, or corneal abrasions, the eye is irrigated with saline, particulate matter is removed, and antibiotic ointment and a sterile dressing are applied.

In the first 24 hours, ice packs are placed on the eyelid to reduce swelling and decrease internal bleeding. After the first day, warm compresses may be used every 1 to 2 hours to relieve tenderness and aid in resorption of the blood. Sunglasses may be worn to protect the eyes from bright light. The individual's head should be elevated during sleep until symptoms subside. Acetaminophen is usually recommended for pain; aspirin or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) should not be used because of their tendency to increase bleeding. Other medications may include antibiotics to prevent infection, and/or eye drops to reduce inflammation and minimize bleeding.

If a lid, scleral, or corneal laceration has occurred, treatment may include sutures. Microsurgical techniques are used to close anterior segment wounds. Individuals with bleeding within the front (anterior) chamber of the eye (hyphema) exceeding 5% require bed rest, medication and daily re-examination of the eye. Surgical evacuation of the hyphema is necessary if the intraocular pressure remains elevated.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



ACOEM

ACOEM's Practice Guidelines, the gold standard in effective medical treatment of occupational injuries and illnesses, are provided in this section to complement the disability duration guidelines.*
 
Eye
 
* The relationship between the MDGuidelines (MDA) content and ACOEM's guidelines is approximate and does not always link identical diagnoses. The user should consult the diagnostic codes in both guidelines, as well as the clinical descriptions, before assuming an equivalence.

Source: ACOEM Practice Guidelines






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