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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Contusion


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Diagnosis

History: The individual with a contusion may have a history of a recent injury, usually a blow or a fall. In general, the individual complains of skin discoloration, swelling, and pain. Depending on the location of the contusion, restricted movement or stiffness is a possibility. When questioned, the individual may report use of aspirin or anticoagulants or a history of a blood coagulation disorder such as hemophilia.

Symptoms of bone contusion include severe pain and swelling that can last for weeks to months; swelling involves also the adjacent skin and muscles (soft tissue). Pain persists after the resolution of the soft tissue bruise.

Physical exam: The contusion may appear dark blue or red or yellow-green, depending on how soon the physical exam was performed after the injury. If it is a superficial or muscle contusion of the extremities, then the discoloration may move distally towards the hands or feet as it resolves. The site may feel firm and be tender to the touch. Swelling is usually apparent around the contusion. There may be limited range of motion (ROM) and/or partial loss of function of the proximal and/or distal joints. The extent of the contusion may not be obvious until 2 to 3 days after the incident. Contusions involving a larger area of discoloration in the lower legs may be associated with several weeks of general lower leg, foot, and ankle swelling. Sometimes, there are no visible signs of internal contusions although pain may be reported by the individual on palpation of the chest or abdomen.

Abuse may be a factor in individuals with a history of contusion and physicians should consider this during examination. Specific to contusions in the extremities, pain out of proportion to the extent of injury can be a sign of compartment syndrome and compartment pressure should be measured.

Tests: Tests are usually not needed for this diagnosis unless fracture or internal injury is suspected. With severe contusions, plain x-rays may be needed to rule out a bone fracture. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the imaging technique of choice for soft tissue injury; computed tomography (CT) scans may be used to diagnose deep organ contusions such as in the heart, lung, or abdomen. If the individual has a history of contusions caused by minor trauma, a complete blood count and blood-coagulation tests (prothrombin time [PT], partial thromboplastin time [PTT]) may be done. Changes in blood pressure shortly after injury may indicate significant bleeding.

The best test for the diagnosis of a bone contusion is an MRI scan. Bone contusions do not appear on X-rays. However, X-rays can exclude the presence of a fracture.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor