Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Contusion


Related Terms

  • Black-and-blue Mark
  • Bruise
  • Ecchymosis

Differential Diagnosis

  • Bone fracture
  • Hematoma (tender mass with or without skin discoloration)
  • Internal bleeding (with deep organ involvement)
  • Rhabdomyolysis
  • Ruptured spleen

Specialists

  • Emergency Medicine Physician
  • Family Physician
  • General Surgeon
  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

The extent of injury and type of treatment (medical vs. surgical) may influence duration. Most contusions are not disabling. Hematoma, associated complications, concomitant fracture, and the individual's response to treatment influence the length of disability. Reinjury is a recognized factor in prolonging disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
906.3 - Late Effect of Contusion
921.1 - Contusion of Eyelids and Periocular Area
921.2 - Contusion of Orbital Tissues
921.3 - Contusion of Eyeball
921.9 - Contusion of Eye, Unspecified
922.0 - Contusion of Breast
922.1 - Contusion of Chest Wall
922.2 - Contusion of Abdominal Wall; Flank; Groin
922.31 - Contusion of Back
922.33 - Contusion of Back, Interscapular Region
922.8 - Contusion of Multiple Sites of Trunk
922.9 - Contusion of Unspecified Part of Trunk
923.01 - Contusion of Scapular Region
923.02 - Contusion of Axillary Region
923.03 - Contusion of Upper Arm
923.09 - Contusion of Shoulder and Upper Arm, Multiple Sites
923.10 - Contusion of Forearm
923.11 - Contusion of Elbow
923.20 - Contusion of Hand(s), Except Finger(s) Alone
923.21 - Contusion of Wrist
923.8 - Contusion of Multiple Sites of Upper Limb
923.9 - Contusion of Unspecified Part of Upper Limb
924.00 - Contusion of Thigh
924.01 - Contusion of Hip
924.10 - Contusion of Lower Leg
924.11 - Contusion of Knee
924.20 - Contusion of Foot, Excluding Toes; Heel
924.21 - Contusion of Ankle
924.3 - Contusion of Toe or Toenail
924.4 - Contusion of Multiple Sites of Lower Limb
924.5 - Contusion of Unspecified Part of Lower Limb
924.8 - Contusion Multiple Sites, Not Elsewhere Classified
924.9 - Contusion of Lower Limb

Diagnosis

History: The individual with a contusion may have a history of a recent injury, usually a blow or a fall. In general, the individual complains of skin discoloration, swelling, and pain. Depending on the location of the contusion, restricted movement or stiffness is a possibility. When questioned, the individual may report use of aspirin or anticoagulants or a history of a blood coagulation disorder such as hemophilia.

Physical exam: The contusion may appear dark blue or red or yellow-green, depending on how soon the physical exam was performed after the injury. If it is a superficial or muscle contusion of the extremities, then the discoloration may move distally, towards the hands or feet as it resolves. The site may feel firm and be tender to the touch. Swelling is usually apparent around the bruise. There may be limited range of motion (ROM) and/or loss of function of the proximal and/or distal joints. The extent of the contusion may not be obvious until 2 to 3 days after the incident. Contusions involving a larger area of discoloration in the lower legs may be associated with several weeks of general lower leg, foot and ankle swelling. Sometimes, there are no visible signs of internal contusions although pain may be reported by the individual on palpation of the chest or abdomen.

Abuse may be a factor in individuals with a history of contusion and physicians should consider this during examination. Specific to contusions in the extremities, pain out of proportion to the extent of injury can be a sign of compartment syndrome and compartment pressure should be measured.

Tests: Tests are usually not needed for this diagnosis unless fracture or internal injury is suspected. With severe contusions, plain x-rays may be needed to rule out a bone fracture. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the imaging technique of choice for soft tissue injury; CT scans may be used to diagnose deep organ contusions such as in the heart, lung, or abdomen. If the individual has a history of contusions caused by minor trauma, a complete blood count and blood-coagulation tests (prothrombin time or PT, partial thromboplastin time or PTT) may be done. Changes in blood pressure shortly after injury may indicate significant bleeding.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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