Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Coronary Atherosclerosis


Overview

© Reed Group
Coronary atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease characterized by the accumulation of white blood cells, cell debris, fatty substances (cholesterol and fatty acids), calcium, and fibrous tissue (plaque or atheromas) on the walls of the coronary arteries that supply the heart muscle. As plaque slowly increases in size over many years, the artery narrows in places (stenosis), and blood flow to part of the heart muscle is reduced. Cholesterol-containing plaques are highly dangerous even without narrowing of the vessel because the fibrous cap can be softened and rupture suddenly during acute heavy exercise or activity (e.g., athletic effort, shoveling snow). This can result in blood clot formation on top of the plaque that may totally obstruct the vessel, resulting in a heart attack (myocardial infarction). Even without the plaque rupturing, the stenosis may over time become so significant that the blood supply is inadequate to meet the needs of the heart (myocardial ischemia), and the affected part of the heart muscle no longer functions normally. Myocardial ischemia typically results in chest pain (angina pectoris), but may also cause no symptoms (silent ischemia).

Incidence and Prevalence: Coronary atherosclerosis is the most common form of heart disease and the leading cause of death for both men and women in the US. An estimated 16.3 million Americans have coronary heart disease, 7.0% of all Americans over the age of 20. In 2008, 405,309 people died from CHD. In 2009, over 1.5 million hospital discharges noted CHD as a factor (Roger; Schiller).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor