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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Cystitis, Interstitial


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Diagnosis

History: Symptoms range from mild discomfort, pressure, and lower abdominal (suprapelvic) tenderness to intense bladder pain felt in the suprapubic area, cramping with urination, frequent urination (frequency), feeling pressure (urgency) to urinate, abnormally excessive urination during the night (nocturia), and burning or pain with urination (dysuria). Pain increases as the bladder fills, causing an uncontrollable urge to urinate; urination produces relief of pain. In most cases, a course of antibiotics will fail to resolve the symptoms. Individuals may also have chronic pain in the pelvis or between the genital area and anus (perineum). In severe cases, individuals may urinate more than 60 times a day, and up to 10 times during the night. Individuals may also report pain during sexual intercourse (dyspareunia). Symptoms may increase during menses, as well as with sexual activity, exercise, and stress. Coffee, tea, carbonated drinks, tobacco, alcohol, and spicy or acidic foods may aggravate the symptoms.

Physical exam: In women, a pelvic exam is done to rule out other conditions that could cause similar symptoms, such as vaginal infection or endometriosis. In men, the urethral opening is examined for evidence of a skin lesion, swelling, or discharge. The prostate and testes are examined for swelling and tenderness and to rule out conditions such as urethritis, prostatitis, and orchitis.

Tests: Urinalysis and urine culture are performed to rule out UTI. In men, prostatic fluid is also analyzed. Interstitial cystitis is suspected if the urine culture is sterile while symptoms continue over a period of weeks or months. Fiber-optic examination of the bladder (cystoscopy) under anesthesia reveals pinpoint bleeding caused by chronic irritation as well as thickening and inflammation of the bladder wall; benign bladder (Hunner) ulcers are identified in 5-10% of individuals with the condition. During the course of the cystoscopy, a tissue sample may be removed for biopsy; microscopic examination can confirm the presence of inflammation and rule out bladder cancer.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor