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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Cystitis, Interstitial


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Treatment

There is currently no cure for interstitial cystitis. Treatment is aimed at symptomatic relief. Dietary changes focus on avoiding irritating substances such as spicy and potassium-rich foods, citrus fruits, tomatoes, coffee, tea, chocolate, alcohol, and tobacco.

Pentosan polysulfate, a medication intended to increase the protective layer of the bladder wall, may be prescribed. Oral pain relievers such as aspirin, ibuprofen, or codeine may be helpful. Tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline or imipramine, generally administered in lower doses than when administered for depression, have beneficial incidental effects that reduce the chronic pain and the stress that accompany interstitial cystitis. Another option involves delivering dimethyl sulfoxide or other medicated solutions directly into the bladder through a urethral catheter. Aimed at inhibiting painful inflammation, this technique involves treatments every other week for at least 6 to 8 weeks. Some highly motivated individuals may be trained to catheterize themselves so that they can perform the treatments at home.

A procedure called transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), which delivers mild electric pulses to the bladder area, may help relieve pain and urinary frequency in some cases. Sacral nerve root stimulation, a surgical variation of TENS, involves permanent implantation of electrodes and a unit emitting continuous electrical pulses.

Stretching the bladder by filling it with fluid under pressure (hydrodistention) can bring temporary relief from symptoms.

Rarely surgery may be considered as a last resort if more conservative treatments are ineffective and symptoms are severe. Surgery includes burning off (fulguration) or cutting away (resection) ulcers using instruments inserted into the urethra through a cystoscope, surgical augmentation of the bladder using tissue from the individual's large intestine, or bladder removal (cystectomy). After a cystectomy, urine is usually collected in a bag (appliance) attached to a stomal opening in the abdomen. Continent urinary diversions eliminating the need for an appliance can be offered to the individual.

Support groups specifically for interstitial cystitis may be helpful in addressing the emotional aspect of dealing with a chronic disorder.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor