Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Degeneration, Lumbar Intervertebral Disc


Related Terms

  • DDD
  • Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD)
  • Low Back Pain
  • Lumbar Disc Disease

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Chiropractor
  • Neurologist
  • Neurosurgeon
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon
  • Physiatrist (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist)
  • Physical Therapist
  • Preventive Medicine Specialist
  • Rheumatologist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

Individual's age, occupation, aerobic fitness level, and severity of symptoms may all influence the length of disability. The presence of concomitant chronic illness and/or psychosocial factors may affect length of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
722.52 - Lumbar or Lumbosacral Disc Degeneration
722.73 - Lumbar Disc Disorder with Myelopathy

References

Cited

Battié, M. C. , et al. "The Twin Spine Study: Contributions to a changing view of disc degeneration." Spine 9 (2009): 47-59.

Bigos, S., et al. "Acute Low Back Problems in Adults." Clinical Practice Guidelines. 14th ed. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Policy Research (AHCPR), 1994.

Carey, T. S., et al. "The Outcomes and Costs of Care for Acute Low Back Pain Among Patients Seen by Primary Care Practitioners, Chiropractors, and Orthopedic Surgeons." New England Journal of Medicine 333 (14) (1995): 913-917.

Carragee, E. J. , et al. "Does Discography Cause Accelerated Progression of Degenerative Changes in the Lumbar Disc: A Ten-Year Matched Cohort Study." Spine 34 (21) (2009): 2338-2345.

Carragee, E., et al. "Are First-time Episodes of Serious Low Back Pain Illness Associated with New MRI Findings?" Spine 6 6 (2006): 624-635.

Carragee, E., et al. "Does Minor Trauma Cause Serious Low Back Pain Illness?" Spine 31 25 (2006): 2942-2949.

Gross, D. P. , and M. C. Battié. "Functional Capacity Evaluation Performance Does Not Predict Sustained Return to Work in Claimants with Chronic Back Pain." Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation 15 (3) (2005): 285-294.

Hall, H. , et al. "Effect of Discharge Recommendations on Outcome." Spine 19 (18) (1994): 2033-2037.

Hoff, Julian T. "Intervertebral Disc Disease." Current Surgical Diagnosis & Treatment. Eds. L. W. Way and Gerald M. Doherty. 11th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2004. 952-958.

Kendall, N., S. J. Linton, and C. J. Main, eds. "Guide to Assessing Psychological Yellow Flags in Acute Low Back Pain." Risk Factors for Long-Term Disabilities and Work Loss. Wellington, New Zealand: The National Health Committee, 1997.

Kjaer, P. , et al. "An Epidemiologic Study of MRI and Low Back Pain in 13-Year Old Children." Spine 30 (7) (2005): 798-806.

Loisel, P., et al. "A Population-based, Randomized Clinical Trial on Back Pain Management." Spine 22 24 (1997): 2911-2918.

Malmivaara, A., et al. "The Treatment of Acute Low Back Pain--Bed Rest, Exercises, or Ordinary Activity?" New England Journal of Medicine 332 6 (1995): 351-355.

Patel, Rajeev K., and Curtis W. Slipman. "Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease." eMedicine. Eds. J. Michael Wieting, et al. 1 Oct. 2004. Medscape. 10 Sep. 2004 <http://emedicine.com/pmr/topic67.htm>.

van Tulder, M. W., et al. "Behavioral Treatment for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review within the Framework of the Cochrane Back Review Group." Spine 26 3 (2001): 270-281.

Williams, Keith D., and Ashley L. Park. "Lumbar Disc Disease." Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics. Eds. S. Terry Canale and James H. Beaty. 11th ed. Philadelphia: Mosby Elsevier, 2008. 2199-2216.

General

Williams, Keith D., and Ashley L. Park. "Lumbar Disc Disease." Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics. Eds. S. Terry Canale and James H. Beaty. 11th ed. Philadelphia: Mosby Elsevier, 2008. 2199-2216.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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