Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Depersonalization / Derealization Disorder


Related Terms

  • Dissociation
  • Psychiatric Disorder
  • Psychological Trauma
  • Repressed Memory

Differential Diagnosis

  • Anxiety disorders (DSM-5)
  • Direct physiological effects of a general medical condition
  • Illness anxiety disorder (DSM-5)
  • Major depressive disorder (DSM-5)
  • Mental disorders secondary to another medical condition (DSM-5)
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (DSM-5)
  • Psychotic disorders (DSM-5)
  • Substance- or medication-induced disorders (DSM-5)

Specialists

  • Clinical Psychologist
  • Psychiatrist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

The frequency and severity of symptoms, exacerbating factors, and associated disorders influence length of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
300.6 - Depersonalization Disorder; Derealization (Neurotic); Neurotic State with Depersonalization Episode

Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

Work accommodations might include using a job coach to establish consistent, predictable work behaviors; developing a structured, consistent set of work activities; limiting contact with coworkers and the general public; and adjusting the work schedule to accommodate medical or psychiatric appointments.

Risk: Individuals with recurrent brief episodes of depersonalization disorder may compromise the safety of coworkers and therefore should not be assigned job tasks that involve the use of power tools, heavy equipment, or vehicles. These individuals may be best suited to positions in which they are not responsible for the health, safety, or well-being of others.

Capacity: The presence of this condition in an adult who is already performing a job does not have an additional effect on capacity.

Tolerance: Tolerance varies from individual to individual but is typically not an issue with this diagnosis. Some individuals may benefit from the use of stress management techniques or self-instruction training to help them cope with distressing symptoms and enhance work productivity. For those who have these conditions continuously, the only issue is that stress can make the condition worsen temporarily. For those who have these conditions sporadically, stressors likely to cause an exacerbation should be identified and then avoided or mitigated. The provoking situation may be eliminated partially or fully, and/or the individual may learn techniques to cope with it.

Accommodations: Individuals with symptoms of detachment, distorted time sense, or apathy may require more supervision than individuals without the disorder. If medications are prescribed to control symptoms, the individual may require periodic drug testing to ensure that substance abuse or addiction does not become a concern.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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