Sign-in
(your email):
(case sensitive):



 
 

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Dizziness and Giddiness


Text Only Home | Graphic-Rich Site | Overview | Risk and Causation | Diagnosis | Treatment | Prognosis | Differential Diagnosis | Specialists | Comorbid Conditions | Complications | Factors Influencing Duration | Length of Disability | Duration Trends | Ability to Work | Failure to Recover | Medical Codes | References

Overview

Dizziness is a term that is used to explain different sensations, such as lightheadedness and spinning (vertigo) accompanied by an involuntary, rapid, rhythmic eye movement (nystagmus); giddiness; and feeling as if one is going to faint (syncope). Without other symptoms, this condition usually is not serious.

There are many causes for dizziness and giddiness. Decrease in circulating blood and oxygen to the brain can cause dizziness and fainting. Irregular heart rate or rhythm (dysrhythmia) can result in a sudden reduction in the amount of blood pumped to the brain and can cause dizziness. Temporary deficiency of blood in the brain secondary to narrowing of the arteries in the brain (cerebral transient ischemic attack, or TIA) also can result in dizziness. Sudden change in position from sitting or lying to standing can cause a drop in blood pressure (orthostatic or postural hypotension) and dizziness. Dizziness can result from taking medications such as vasodilators, decongestants, antidepressants, antihypertensives, antihistamines, or diuretics; from anemia due to blood loss; and from decreased blood volume or fluid loss from trauma or sweating (dehydration). When lightheaded dizziness leads to syncope or loss of consciousness, problems with blood circulation (heart, blood vessels, and problems that affect their function) must be checked. Dizziness also may occur with diabetes mellitus, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease.

Disorders involving the balance organs in the ear resulting from infection or inflammation of the inner ear (labyrinthitis), inner ear fluid imbalance (Ménière's disease), viral infection of the vestibular nerve (vestibular neuronitis), and inner ear fluid leaking into the middle ear can cause individuals to feel dizzy or unsteady; ringing in the ears (tinnitus) also can develop. Double vision (diplopia) is a more serious symptom that may indicate a disease affecting the brainstem, warning of a serious stroke, or other disease processes. Slurred speech (dysarthria) that accompanies dizziness and vertigo points to a process affecting the brain itself (e.g., a stroke, brain tumor).

Other causes of dizziness include anxiety, stress, fatigue, high fever, strenuous coughing, straining with defecation or urination, stomach flu (gastroenteritis), common cold, pressure on the neck (e.g., tight collar), spinning rapidly around in a circle (as during carnival rides), low blood pressure (hypotension), severe pain, injury, fright, standing rigidly at attention for an extended period, alcohol intoxication, use of illicit drugs, hyperventilation, low blood glucose (hypoglycemia), perforated eardrum (tympanic membrane), ear diseases (i.e., mastoiditis, otitis media, cholesteatoma, vestibular neuronitis), and hysterical seizures.

Incidence and Prevalence: Incidence of dizziness, vertigo, and imbalance is 5% to 10% in the general population (Friedman). Annual incidence of BPPV is 64 per 100,000 population (Chang). Prevalence of dizziness caused by fluid disturbances in the inner ear (e.g., Ménière's disease) is 1,000 per 100,000 population (Li). In cases of acute vertigo, 170 cases per 100,000 population are caused by vestibular neuronitis (Friedman). Dizziness caused by a tumor on cranial nerve VIII (acoustic neuroma) is less common, affecting 1.1 per 100,000 population (Friedman).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor