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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Adjustment Disorder with Disturbance of Conduct


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Failure to Recover

If an individual fails to recover within the expected maximum duration period, the reader may wish to consider the following questions to better understand the specifics of an individual's medical case.

Regarding diagnosis:

  • Does individual exhibit significant emotional or behavioral symptoms as a result of a stressor or life event?
  • Was diagnosis confirmed? Were other psychiatric and substance abuse disorders ruled out?
  • Were medical disorders with psychiatric presentations rule out?
  • If there is concurrent drug or alcohol abuse, to what extent are these conditions causing additional problems?

Regarding treatment:

  • Has stressor been identified?
  • Was stressful situation eliminated? Would environmental modification or hospitalization be beneficial?
  • Is additional or extended use of group or individual therapy warranted?
  • Is individual motivated to participate in treatment, and does individual possess the capacity to engage in psychological exploration?
  • Has pharmacotherapy been added to the psychotherapy regimen for the most effective results?
  • Were anti-anxiety agents or antidepressants prescribed?
  • Are social supports adequate?

Regarding prognosis:

  • How are current stresses being dealt with?
  • How were major stresses dealt with in the past? If methods of coping are maladaptive (i.e., drug or alcohol abuse), to what extent are these conditions causing additional problems?
  • Who are individual's social supports? Family? Friends? Church or other community affiliations? Are these being utilized?
  • What is happening outside of work that may be contributing to or worsening the problems experienced at work?
  • Are there incentives not to improve such as ongoing litigation, social security, or disability insurance?
  • Does individual have an underlying condition that may impact recovery?
  • Does individual have symptoms of other disorders that may be affecting recovery?
  • Does a stressor exist that has not been identified?
  • Is individual motivated to recover, or do symptoms fulfill psychological, personal, or economic factors?

Source: Medical Disability Advisor