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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Alcohol Intoxication, Acute


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Complications

Alcohol intoxication, especially in an intolerant individual, can lead to seizures, respiratory arrest, coma, and death. Sudden withdrawal of alcohol in someone who has had an excessive intake can lead to tremors, anxiety, agitation, hallucinations, grand mal seizures, or death. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is a neurological condition caused by an acute deficiency of vitamin B1 (thiamine), which is often related to acute and chronic alcohol use. Symptoms include confusion, profound short-term memory loss, incoordination, and abnormalities of eye movement (gaze palsies).

Excessive prolonged use of alcohol can damage the stomach lining (gastritis), esophagus (esophagitis and esophageal stricture), liver (liver failure, cirrhosis, portal hypertension with esophageal varices), pancreas (pancreatitis), and heart (cardiomyopathy). Accidental inhalation of vomit or oropharyngeal fluids while intoxicated may lead to aspiration pneumonia through colonization of the upper respiratory tract with gram-negative bacteria (GNB), which may be found in up to 50% of alcoholics but only 10% of non-alcoholics. Poor nutrition contributes to anemia and vitamin deficiencies. Prolonged alcohol intake is toxic to the nervous system, and can damage the nerves in the hands, lower legs, and feet (peripheral neuropathy). Brain function may be chronically impaired and can lead to short- and long-term memory impairment, disturbances of balance and coordination, or the loss of higher brain functions such as judgment, abstract thinking, and language. Psychosocial consequences, such as loss of relationships or employment; legal consequences, such as arrests for "driving under the influence" or motor vehicle accidents; violence; and suicide may result from alcoholism. Heavy drinking during pregnancy can result in fetal alcohol syndrome.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor