Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Brain Injury


Rehabilitation

An individual with a brain injury that has caused physical and mental deficits may need rehabilitation to facilitate recovery. The overall objective for rehabilitation of individuals with TBI is to return them as quickly and as fully as possible to the mainstream of their lives. This requires achieving functional recovery and assisting the individual in coping with disabilities that may remain.

A coordinated treatment approach from a team of healthcare professionals is necessary for treatment to succeed. Participants in the rehabilitation program can include physical, occupational, speech, and recreational therapists, social workers, and vocational counselors. Therapists must set goals to make effective use of time and resources when treating severe symptoms that have resulted from trauma to the brain. Rehabilitation varies for each individual because of the uniqueness of the problems after each particular brain injury. Involving family members in treatment can help motivate and support the individual. Sensory stimulation from a nearby radio or individuals talking may be helpful even when the individual's level of consciousness has decreased.

A physiatrist can best assess the degree of mental and functional disability following brain injury. Rehabilitation is then recommended based on the degree of deficits. Most individuals with severe brain injury (e.g., initial GCS scores less than 8) benefit from formal neurorehabilitation. Some individuals with major brain injury and significant mental and functional deficits may be referred to an inpatient rehabilitation facility. Even after regaining consciousness, the individual may still be confused and easily distracted and will benefit from exercises to promote memory return. Instruction designed to help the individual carry out simple tasks can be as elementary as motivating individuals to receive an object in their hand or assisting them to go from a sitting position to a standing position.

In rehabilitation of a brain injury, the therapist must sequence activities from easy to more difficult. For example, the therapist must teach the individual to roll in bed and rise from a chair before beginning instruction in proper walking patterns. Once the individual regains his or her thinking processes, rehabilitation may turn to the needs of muscular strength, endurance, and flexibility. To correct muscle imbalance, the therapist will use techniques that make the muscular and nervous systems work together. Group activities may take place in mat classes, wheelchair classes, or in other activities such as volleyball games.

When appropriate, the final phase of rehabilitation following brain injury involves the individual's return to work. Both physical and mental exercises are now directed toward meeting work requirements. The rehabilitation therapist may need to make modifications for those with various levels of head trauma.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor