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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Somatic Symptom Disorder and Illness Anxiety Disorder


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Overview

According to the DSM-IV-TR, hypochondriasis is a type of mental health disorder called a somatoform disorder in which the individual believes that real or imagined physical symptoms are signs of a serious illness despite medical reassurance that they are not. The individual's concerns about having a serious illness are generally based on a preoccupation with bodily functions and the interpretation of normal sensations (such as heartbeats, sweating, peristaltic action, and bowel movements) or minor abnormalities (e.g., a runny nose, minor aches and pains, or slightly swollen nodes) as indications of highly disturbing problems needing medical attention. An individual with hypochondriasis might think, "I have a headache; therefore, I must have a brain tumor." Hypochondriasis is sometimes episodic, suggesting that it may be related to stressful life events (DSM-IV-TR).

Negative results of diagnostic evaluations and reassurance by physicians only increase the individual's anxious concern about his or her health. The individual feels distressed because of the negative findings and seeks further medical attention. The ability of many hypochondriacs to function in social, occupational, and interpersonal roles may be impaired (DSM-IV-TR).

Frequent appointments with health care providers are typical, and time off from work is often taken for doctors' appointments, treatments, laboratory tests, and so on. In one general medical outpatient clinic, 88% of patients with this condition also had a concurrent disorder such as general anxiety disorder, depression, or panic disorder (Xiong).

In the DSM-5, hypochondriasis is included in somatic symptom disorder and illness anxiety disorder; it is thought that about 75% of individuals previously diagnosed with hypochondriasis will fall into the diagnosis of somatic symptom disorder, and that about 25% of individuals with hypochondriasis who have high health anxiety without somatic symptoms and without qualifying for an anxiety disorder diagnosis will fall into the diagnosis of illness anxiety disorder (DSM-5).

Incidence and Prevalence: Hypochondriasis can occur at any age but peaks in adolescence and during middle age. Men and women appear to be affected equally. The prevalence of hypochondriasis in the general population is 1% to 5%, and 2% to 7% among primary care outpatients (DSM-IV-TR). It has been reported that 10% to 20% of healthy people and 45% of people without a major psychiatric disorder have intermittent unfounded worries about their health; international rates are similar to US rates (Xiong).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor