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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Liver Biopsy


Text Only Home | Graphic-Rich Site | Overview | Reason for Procedure | How Procedure is Performed | Prognosis | Specialists | Comorbid Conditions | Complications | Factors Influencing Duration | Length of Disability | Ability to Work | Medical Codes | References

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
50.11 - Closed (Percutaneous) (Needle) Biopsy of Liver
50.12 - Liver Biopsy, Open
50.14 - Laparoscopic Liver Biopsy

Related Terms

  • Needle Aspiration Liver Biopsy
  • Percutaneous Liver Biopsy

Overview

Liver biopsy is a diagnostic procedure in which a small sample of tissue is removed from the liver for laboratory examination. Samples are most often obtained from three different sites, since liver diseases may be patchy and not widespread (diffuse). These sites are chosen based on the suspected areas of disease. Laboratory tests on the samples include culture for infectious agents, chemical analysis, and microscopic analysis.

Liver biopsy is the most definitive method of diagnosing liver diseases (cirrhosis and hepatitis). It is also helpful in the evaluation of acute hepatitis of unexplained cause, unexplained jaundice, unexplained hepatomegaly, and unexplained abnormal liver chemistry and in follow-up of individuals receiving long-term methotrexate therapy for rheumatoid arthritis or psoriatic arthritis.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Reason for Procedure

Liver biopsies are performed to diagnose or assess liver diseases (cirrhosis and different types of hepatitis). Biopsies can help to diagnose tumors or lymphomas (tumors of lymphatic tissue) that can spread throughout the body, affecting the liver as well as many other organs. Liver biopsies assist in determining the cause of fevers of unknown origin and can determine if there are complications from liver transplant operations. In addition, a liver biopsy can provide important information on the effectiveness of treatment for liver diseases such as chronic active hepatitis.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



How Procedure is Performed

There are two commonly used needle biopsy techniques of the liver: blind percutaneous technique and suction technique. Both techniques are usually done in the individual's hospital room. Prior to surgery, ultrasonography of the liver is sometimes done to outline the position and boundaries of the liver. Ultrasonography is also used during the procedure in some cases to guide the biopsy in the proper position.

The individual lies down on his or her back (supine position). The skin is cleaned with an antiseptic solution, and then the biopsy site is draped with a sterile towel. The skin and deeper structures are anesthetized with local anesthetic injection. A small skin incision is made. In the blind percutaneous procedure, the needle is inserted through the skin incision, punctures the liver, and is withdrawn. In the suction technique, the needle is inserted through the skin incision through a plastic tube (cannula), and suction is applied through the needle as it punctures the liver (allowing for a quicker biopsy). With both techniques, tissue is often taken from up to three different sites, based on suspected area of pathology. When the biopsy is completed, the area is bandaged.

A less commonly used technique for a liver biopsy is a laparoscopy.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Prognosis

The procedure is successful in providing liver tissue specimens for examination. The vast majority of individuals undergoing liver biopsy recover fully from the procedure without complications. Complications are rare but can be lethal if they happen.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Specialists

  • Gastroenterologist
  • General Surgeon
  • Radiologist

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Comorbid Conditions

  • Heart disease
  • Liver disease
  • Obesity

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Complications

Complications of liver biopsy include pain at site of entry, hemorrhage, bile peritonitis, pneumothorax, severe apprehension, shock, bacteremia, sepsis, bile embolism, penetration of abdominal viscera, arteriovenous fistula, fractured needles, and death (resulting from hemorrhage or bile peritonitis).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Factors Influencing Duration

Length of disability may be influenced by the type of biopsy procedure performed, the presence of an underlying liver disease, or the presence of complications.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

Work restrictions or special accommodations are not usually associated with a liver biopsy procedure.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



References

General

Flora, Kenneth D., and Kenneth Ingram. "Diagnostic Liver Biopsy." eMedicine. Eds. Robert J. Fingerote, et al. 9 Mar. 2004. Medscape. 21 May 2005 <http://emedicine.com/med/topic2969.htm>.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor