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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Liver Disease


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Diagnosis

History: A family history of hepatitis, occupational and environmental exposures, contact with jaundiced individuals, recent vaccinations, drugs, medical treatment, episodes of jaundice, recent illness, drug use, transfusions, and tattooing may be reported. It is important to keep in mind that many people with liver disease have no symptoms. The most common nonspecific symptoms include fatigue, weakness, fever and chills, weight loss, and occasional itching. More specific symptoms of liver disease include yellowing of the skin (jaundice), bleeding from the GI tract, dark urine, mental confusion, and retention of fluids in the abdomen.

Physical exam: The exam may reveal pale skin; muscle loss; yellowing of the skin or whites of the eye (scleral icterus); enlargement of the liver, spleen, and/or salivary gland behind the ear (parotid gland); decreased testicular size; bruising; redness of the palms (palmar erythema); clubbing of the fingers; and darkening of the skin (increase in pigmentation). Tenderness may be noted when touching (palpating) the edge of the liver (liver tip) through the abdominal skin, and fluid in the abdominal cavity (ascites) may be evident.

Tests: Blood tests may include measurement of key liver enzymes (alkaline phosphatase, AST, ALT, GGT, LDH), liver protein (bilirubin, albumin, fibrinogen), ammonia, clotting factors, blood lipids, total blood count, and hematocrit. In order to determine if a form of viral hepatitis is responsible, serologic tests, such as IgM anti-HAV, HBSAG, IgM anti-HBC, and anti-HCV are obtained. In addition, MRI, diagnostic ultrasound, CT scan, or other similar methods of visualization may be performed. A liver biopsy, in which a small piece of liver tissue is removed and analyzed microscopically for evidence of inflammation, cirrhosis, and infection, may also be performed.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor