Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Lyme Disease


Related Terms

  • Lyme Arthritis

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Cardiovascular Internist
  • Dermatologist
  • Family Physician
  • Infectious Disease Internist
  • Neurologist
  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon
  • Preventive Medicine Specialist
  • Rheumatologist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

The length of disability will be influenced by the severity of symptoms, the stage at which the disease is diagnosed and treated, and the presence of any neurologic or cardiac complications.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
088.81 - Arthropod-borne Diseases, Other Specified; Lyme Disease

Overview

Lyme disease is a bacterial infection caused by Borrelia burgdorferi, a spirochete. It is spread by a bite from an infected tick. The tick (Ixodes species) requires a blood meal and feeds primarily on white-tailed deer and white-footed mice. After ingesting bacteria in the blood from infected animals, the tick becomes infected and then spreads the bacteria to the next animal it bites. The ticks also feed on human blood. To pass on the infection, a tick must be attached to the individual for 2 to 3 days. In Europe and Asia, Lyme disease is caused by Borrelia azfelii and Borrelia garinii.

Although a full-grown tick is only one-half the size of a pencil eraser, most bites are from immature ticks (nymphs), which are only about the size of a poppy seed.

The many signs and symptoms of Lyme disease mimic other diseases, making it difficult to diagnose. The disease may have three stages, so symptoms of advanced disease can take months or even years to develop.

Incidence and Prevalence: From 2007 through 2011 between 25,000 and 30,000 cases of Lyme disease were reported annually (CDC Data). In 2011, 96% of cases were concentrated in 13 states: Connecticut, New Hampshire, Delaware, New Jersey, Maine, New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Massachusetts, Vermont, Minnesota, Virginia, and Wisconsin. It was the 6th most common reportable disease in 2011.

There is a bimodal age distribution with peaks at 5 to 15 years and 35 to 55 years old. However, cases occur in all age groups. The most commonly reported age and gender category is among boys aged 5 to 9. Up to age 60, the disease is reported more often in males than females. This difference is more pronounced at younger ages.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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