Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Transurethral Removal of Obstruction from Ureter


Related Terms

  • Transurethral Ureteropyeloscopy
  • Ureteral Stone-basketing

Specialists

  • Urologist

Comorbid Conditions

Factors Influencing Duration

The presence of any complications and the individual's reaction to the procedure will determine the length of disability. Recurrence of kidney stones may necessitate repeat procedures.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
56.0 - Transurethral Removal of Obstruction of Ureter and Renal Pelvis; Removal of: Blood Clot From Ureter or Renal Pelvis without Incision, Calculus from Ureter or Renal Pelvis without Incision, Foreign Body From Ureter or Renal Pelvis without Incision

Overview

The transurethral removal of an obstruction from the ureter (transurethral ureteropyeloscopy) involves insertion into the urethral opening of a flexible, lighted, fiberoptic instrument followed by advancement through the urethra and bladder into the ureter in order to remove stones (calculi) that have become lodged in it. The procedure is most often performed to remove calculi from the tubular passageway (ureter) that leads from the kidney to the urinary bladder.

Stone formation in the kidneys (urolithiasis) occurs when excess stone-forming mineral salts such as calcium (80% of all stones), uric acid, or struvite present in supersaturated urine are not cleared by the kidneys and urinary tract and begin to accumulate and crystallize. Stones can form as a result of excess calcium in the urine (hypercalciuria), certain cancers (multiple myelomas, lung cancer, and metastatic bone cancer), overactivity of the parathyroid glands (hyperparathyroidism) or a rare congenital condition (cystinuria) resulting in stones composed of the amino acid cysteine. Stones can also form in people who do not consume enough fluids (chronic dehydration) or in those who are immobile for prolonged periods. Kidney stones occur more frequently in people with a high salt intake, in those people who work in more sedentary occupations (e.g., white-collar workers, educators, physicians) or who live in hot climates, and in individuals with a family history of kidney stones. Certain medications (some antihypertensives and antacids) are also associated with kidney stone formation because of their effect on calcium absorption and excretion.

More than 70% of kidney stones smaller than 4 millimeters in size are passed spontaneously through the urinary tract, whereas only 15% of stones larger than 6 millimeters do so. These larger stones may become lodged in either ureter (ureteral stones). Endoscopic procedures are often required to remove stones that do not pass spontaneously. The most common method employed to remove kidney stones involves transurethral procedures. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) may be performed to break up a stone, allowing its spontaneous passage or easier removal using a transurethral approach. Stones in the ureter may also be removed by open surgery.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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