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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Electrocardiogram


Text Only Home | Graphic-Rich Site | Overview | Reason for Procedure | How Procedure is Performed | Prognosis | Specialists | Complications | Factors Influencing Duration | Length of Disability | Ability to Work | Medical Codes | References

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
89.50 - Ambulatory Cardiac Monitoring; Analog Devices [Holter-type]
89.51 - Rhythm Electrocardiogram; Rhythm EKG (with One to Three Leads)
89.52 - Electrocardiogram; ECG NOS; EKG (with 12 or More Leads)
89.55 - Phonocardiogram with ECG Lead

Related Terms

  • ECG
  • EKG

Overview

The electrocardiogram (ECG) is a recording of the electrical activity of the heart. The ECG recording is made by placing small metal discs (electrodes) on the skin at several locations. These electrodes transmit electrical signals from the heart to the ECG machine, which then displays the recordings on a monitor and prints a paper copy of the recording. Analysis and interpretation of these recordings indicate whether there are abnormal or life-threatening changes in the function of the heart. The ECG can be used for several different purposes, including the cardiac stress test and elective cardioversion.

A special use of the ECG, the cardiac stress test, measures heart activity while an individual is walking or running to determine whether there is heart disease. Analysis and interpretation of the ECG readings taken during the cardiac stress test can indicate, among other things, whether the individual has a blockage in the blood supply to the heart or an interference with the heart's ability to generate the correct sequence of electrical impulses needed for a normal heart rhythm.

The ECG is also essential for monitoring the status of an individual's heart rate during a procedure called elective cardioversion. Elective cardioversion is used to slow an abnormally fast heart rate (atrial fibrillation) that has not responded to medication used to slow the heart rate. During elective cardioversion, the heart rate is slowed by pulsing an electric current, which is calibrated with the individual's ECG recording, through special electrodes placed on the individual's chest.

Many healthcare workers refer to the ECG as an "EKG" in order to prevent misunderstandings in the similarity of sound between ECG and EEG (electroencephalogram, a study of the brain).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Reason for Procedure

The ECG is essential in the diagnosis of various disease conditions of the heart, including coronary artery disease (angina and heart attack), disturbances in heart rhythm (arrhythmias), disturbances in electrical conduction (heart blocks), thickening of the heart muscle, or acute inflammation of the membrane that covers the heart (acute pericarditis). It can be used to determine whether heart damage is due to a recent heart attack (myocardial infarction) or an old one. The procedure is commonly performed during routine periodic physical examination.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



How Procedure is Performed

The individual lies on a bed or couch while electrodes are placed on the skin at the wrists, ankles, and several locations across the chest. The electrodes are connected by wires to a control unit that selects different combinations of heart signals to record. The resulting electrical signals are amplified and recorded on paper or displayed on a monitor. The test takes only a few minutes and is painless.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Prognosis

The electrocardiogram offers excellent diagnostic information about the electrical activity of the heart. It can be used in wellness and disease prevention as a part of an individual's routine health check-up or as an aid when diagnosing the reason for specific symptoms, such as chest pain.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Specialists

  • Cardiologist, Cardiovascular Physician
  • Family Physician
  • Internal Medicine Physician

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Complications

There is a slight risk of skin sensitivity to the electrodes.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Factors Influencing Duration

The underlying condition for which the ECG was performed may influence the length of disability; however, there is no disability associated with the test itself.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

No work restrictions or accommodations are associated with this procedure.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



References

General

Goldberger, A. L. Clinical Electrocardiography. 6th ed. St. Louis: Mosby, Inc., 1999.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor