Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Electroencephalogram


Related Terms

  • EEG

Specialists

  • Clinical Neurophysiologist
  • Neurologist
  • Neurosurgeon

Factors Influencing Duration

The underlying neurological or psychological condition for which the EEG is ordered may influence length of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
89.14 - Electroencephalogram (EEG)
89.19 - Video and Radio-telemetered Electroencephalographic Monitoring; Radiographic EEG Monitoring; Video EEG Monitoring

Overview

An electroencephalogram (EEG) is a graphic recording of the electric potential produced by brain cells, as detected by electrodes placed on the scalp. The resulting brain waves are called alpha, beta, delta, and theta rhythms according to the frequencies they produce.

The wave range frequency is from 2 to 12 cycles per second, with the dominant waves being 8 to 10 cycles per second at an amplitude ranging from 10 to 100 microvolts. Variations in brain wave activity are correlated with different neurologic conditions such as seizure disorders (epilepsy), psychological states, and level of consciousness as in sleep versus awake states.

Electroencephalography is the process of recording brain wave activity. During neurosurgery, an electrode can be applied directly to the surface of the brain (intracranial electroencephalography) or placed within the brain tissue (depth electroencephalography) to detect brain tumors or lesions. A flat or isoelectric EEG is one in which no brain waves are recorded, indicating a complete lack of brain activity, consistent with brain death.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Reason for Procedure

The test is used to diagnose seizure disorders, brainstem disorders, local (focal) brain tumors or lesions, head injuries, confusion, and impaired consciousness. EEGs are also done to investigate sleep disturbances such as narcolepsy or sleep apnea and other sleep disturbances. It can also help in the evaluation of coma, stroke, tremor, Alzheimer's disease, certain types of dementia, cerebrovascular disease, and brain death.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



How Procedure is Performed

Sixteen to twenty-five electrodes are attached to various areas of the individual's scalp with a gel-like product (collodion). During the procedure, the individual remains quiet, with eyes closed, and refrains from talking or moving. In certain cases, prescribed activities such as breathing harder than usual (hyperventilation), adding flashing lights during the recording, or recording after a period of sleep deprivation may be requested. Recording during sleep is a standard component of the test.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Prognosis

The EEG is a noninvasive procedure that can be performed in the physician's office. The results of the EEG can be normal, abnormal, or abnormal but clinically insignificant.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Complications

Recording of an EEG is a normally noninvasive procedure and usually has no associated complications. Rarely, an individual with a seizure disorder may experience seizures from the flashing lights and/or hyperventilate.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

An EEG can be performed on an outpatient basis. There are no work restrictions or special accommodations except for the individual who has the EEG to assess sleep disturbances. The individual will need to sleep after the procedure, which may require time away from work for a period of 1 day.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor



References

General

"Electroencephalogram (EEG)." InteliHealth. 20 Jul. 2003. 20 May 2005 <http://www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/WSIHW000/9339/34930/267503.html?d=dmtHealthAZ#risks>.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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