Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Encephalitis


Related Terms

  • Cerebritis
  • Encephalomyelitis
  • Equine Encephalitis

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Infectious Disease Internist
  • Neurologist
  • Neurosurgeon

Comorbid Conditions

  • AIDS
  • Immunosuppressive diseases

Factors Influencing Duration

The severity of the inflammation and symptoms, involvement of other nervous system structures, the individual's response to treatment, the presence of complications, and any permanent brain damage may influence length of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
072.2 - Mumps Encephalitis; Mumps Meningoencephalitis
139.0 - Late Effects of Viral Encephalitis
323.01 - Encephalitis and Encephalomyelitis in Viral Diseases Classified Elsewhere
323.2 - Encephalitis, Myelitis, and Encephalomyelitis in Protozoal Diseases Classified Elsewhere
323.41 - Other Encephalitis and Encephalomyelitis Due to Other Infections Classified Elsewhere
323.51 - Encephalitis and Encephalomyelitis following Immunization Procedures
323.61 - Infectious Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM)
323.62 - Postinfectious Encephalitis and Encephalomyelitis, Other
323.71 - Toxic Encephalitis and Encephalomyelitis
323.81 - Causes of Encephalitis, Myelitis, and Encephalomyelitis , Other
323.9 - Encephalitis, Unspecified Cause

Failure to Recover

If an individual fails to recover within the expected maximum duration period, the reader may wish to consider the following questions to better understand the specifics of an individual's medical case.

Regarding diagnosis:

  • Has individual recently been exposed to mosquitoes or ticks? Ingested goat's milk?
  • Does individual have a history of intestinal tract infection (enterovirus)?
  • Is individual HIV positive? Is individual immunosuppressed by any other condition?
  • Has individual recently had measles, chickenpox, rubella, or mumps? Is individual infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV)?
  • Is there a vague feeling of discomfort or illness (malaise), fever, headache, loss of appetite (anorexia), and nausea? Does individual report a stiff neck and back?
  • Is there a change of personality and confusion? Does individual have more apparent mental disturbances, difficulty talking (dysphasia), weakness, seizures, or severe disorientation that suggests later stage disease?
  • Was lumbar puncture done to collect spinal fluid? Were CT, MRI of the brain, or electroencephalography (EEG) performed? Was a brain biopsy required?
  • Was a diagnosis of encephalitis confirmed?

Regarding treatment:

  • For herpes or varicella-zoster encephalitis, did individual receive antiviral medication? Was the medication effective?
  • For other forms of encephalitis, did individual receive supportive treatment, including fluids, nutrients, and electrolytes given intravenously?
  • Were medications administered to reduce fever (antipyretics), intracranial pressure, and inflammation (glucocorticoids)? To prevent seizures (anticonvulsants) and relieve pain (analgesics)?
  • Did individual require aggressive treatment to eliminate excess fluid (diuresis)? If used, was diuresis effective?

Regarding prognosis:

  • What was the cause and severity of the disease? If severe, did individual lose memory, ability to speak coherently, or muscle coordination?
  • Is the individual paralyzed?
  • Are hearing or vision deficits present?
  • Have seizures occurred?
  • Have the membranes that enclose the brain (meninges) also been involved (meningoencephalitis)?
  • How significantly is individual impaired? How will these impairments affect individual's daily activities?

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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