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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Enthesopathy


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Overview

Enthesopathy is a disorder at the site of the insertion of ligaments, tendons, fascia, or articular capsule into bone (enthesis) and is the result of an inflammatory rheumatic or non-rheumatic disease process. In enthesopathy, pain develops in the free nerve endings of entheses (enthesalgia), becoming a source of chronic musculoskeletal pain in some individuals. This process also may promote abnormal calcification or ossification of the tendon or ligament at the insertion into the bone.

Enthesopathy is a presenting part of many inflammatory conditions and is considered a process rather than a disease in itself. Conditions in which enthesopathy may develop include the spondyloarthropathies, septic arthritis, spinal arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, reactive arthritis (reactive arthritis), psoriatic arthritis, enteropathic arthritis (accompanying ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease), and such rare disorders as acne-associated arthritis, celiac disease, and Whipple disease. Enthesopathy is also seen as a complication of avulsion fractures and tendon tears (rarely).

When these inflammatory diseases develop, an enthesis can become irritated and painful, resulting in enthesopathy. The affected enthesis is found most commonly in peripheral joints such as foot joints, elbow and shoulder joints, or hip joints. Enthesopathy is not typically associated with traumatic injuries.

Incidence and Prevalence: Exact incidence cannot be estimated because of the broad range of inflammatory conditions that may result in enthesopathy and because the disorder may not be recorded as a separate diagnosis in patient records.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor