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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Epicondylitis, Medial and Lateral


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Overview

Image Description:
Epicondylitis - A profile of the right arm reveals the humerus bone above the elbow, the extensor muscles in the forearm attached to the lateral epicondyle of the humerus, and a highlighted area of tears in the tendon at the bony part of the elbow. A close up of the highlighted area reveals the tendon attachment at the lateral epicondyle showing tears that cause a painful, tender elbow.
Click to see Image

Epicondylitis suggests an inflammation of the elbow epicondyle either lateral (outside) or medial (inside). Lateral epicondylitis, commonly called tennis elbow, is a painful disorder that originates at the common extensor origin on the lateral humeral epicondyle. Traditionally, it has been described as lateral epicondylitis, despite the fact that repeated studies of pathologic findings do not show inflammation (Orchard). Histologic studies show an angiofibroblastic dysplasia from microtears on the tendon. Hence, lateral epicondylopathy may be semantically more correct. Runge is usually credited for the first description in 1873 of the condition (Runge), while the term "tennis elbow" was first used in 1883 by Major in his paper "Lawn-tennis elbow" (Major; Kaminsky).

A similar condition can occur in the common flexor tendon origin at the medial elbow and has been labeled as golfer's elbow, medial epicondylitis, or medial epicondylopathy.

Symptoms of epicondylitis often occur with overuse or overexertion of the forearm and wrist muscles. Improper training, poor technique, or improperly sized equipment often contributes to the disorder (Blackwell). Some cases have been described after acute trauma from a blow to the elbow or a sudden maximal muscle contraction.

Incidence and Prevalence: Lateral epicondylitis is at least 5 times more common than medial epicondylitis (Mercier). The exact incidence of lateral epicondylitis is difficult to determine, although among the US population it is estimated at 1% to 3% annually (Bryant; Verhaar). Medial epicondylitis accounts for only about 10% to 20% of all epicondylitis (Young). Approximately 15% of patients experience bilateral symptoms.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor