Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Fracture, Cervical Spine (Without Spinal Cord Injury)


Related Terms

  • Burst Fracture
  • Compression Fracture
  • Hangman's Fracture
  • Jefferson Fracture
  • Teardrop Fracture
  • Vertebral Fracture

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Neurologist
  • Neurosurgeon
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon
  • Physiatrist (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist)
  • Physical Therapist

Factors Influencing Duration

The most important factor that determines the individual’s long-term functional abilities after injury to the cervical spine is how the injury was managed initially. Other important factors include the level of trauma to the vertebrae, whether the individual sustained additional trauma to the rest of the body, position of the affected vertebrae, if the fracture is stable or unstable, and individual's health status at the time of trauma. Fractures that heal with significant deformity may be incompatible with heavy work. The nature of an individual's work, age, complications from the injury, and stability of the fracture after treatment will also influence the length of disability.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
805.0 - Closed Fracture of Cervical Spine without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury
805.00 - Closed Fracture of Cervical Spine, Unspecified Level, without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury
805.01 - Closed Fracture of First Cervical Vertebra without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury
805.02 - Closed Fracture of Second Cervical Vertebra without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury
805.03 - Closed Fracture of Third Cervical Vertebra without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury
805.04 - Closed Fracture of Fourth Cervical Vertebra without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury
805.05 - Closed Fracture of Fifth Cervical Vertebra without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury
805.06 - Closed Fracture of Sixth Cervical Vertebra without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury, Closed
805.07 - Closed Fracture of Seventh Cervical Vertebra without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury, Closed
805.08 - Closed Fracture of Multiple Cervical Vertebra without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury
805.1 - Open Fracture of Cervical Spine without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury
805.10 - Open Fracture of Cervical Spine, Unspecified Level, without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury
805.11 - Open Fracture of First Cervical Vertebra without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury
805.12 - Open Fracture of Second Cervical Vertebra without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury
805.13 - Open Fracture of Third Cervical Vertebra without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury
805.14 - Open Fracture of Fourth Cervical Vertebra without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury
805.15 - Open Fracture of Fifth Cervical Vertebra without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury
805.16 - Open Fracture of Sixth Cervical Vertebra without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury
805.17 - Open Fracture of Seventh Cervical Vertebra without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury
805.18 - Open Fracture of Multiple Cervical Vertebra without Mention of Spinal Cord Injury

Rehabilitation

Rehabilitation guidelines for a fracture of the cervical spine will be based on the fracture type and its management (operative, nonoperative) (Bucholz). The stability of the fracture must be ascertained prior to proceeding with rehabilitation.

If the spinal cord is intact, the rehabilitation protocol depends on the stability of the fracture which may require 6 to 12 weeks of healing. The primary goal is to restore function and to control pain (Salter). Modalities such as cold and heat may help to relieve pain and muscle discomfort. Supervised range of motion and strengthening exercises of the neck, upper extremities, and upper trunk should be initiated when indicated. Simultaneously, individuals should be instructed in neck stabilization and postural exercises.

In addition to undergoing supervised rehabilitation, the individual should be instructed in a home exercise program to be practiced daily and continued independently after the completion of rehabilitation.

FREQUENCY OF REHABILITATION VISITS
Nonsurgical
SpecialistFracture, Cervical Spine (Without Spinal Cord Injury)
Physical TherapistUp to 16 visits within 8 weeks
Surgical
SpecialistFracture, Cervical Spine (Without Spinal Cord Injury)
Physical TherapistUp to 12 visits within 6 weeks
Note on Nonsurgical Guidelines: Rehabilitation may not begin until tissue healing, about 6 to 8 weeks after fracture.
The table above represents a range of the usual acceptable number of visits for uncomplicated cases. It provides a framework based on the duration of tissue healing time and standard clinical practice.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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