Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Fracture, Femur


Overview

A thigh bone (femur) fracture is a break in the upper bone of the leg. Because the femur is the longest, strongest bone in the body, unless the bone is diseased, it takes great force to break it. Femur fracture most commonly occurs after a motor vehicle accident, a collision playing a sport, a fall from a high place, or as the result of a gunshot wound and underlying tumor (neoplasm). Nevertheless, elderly individuals or others who have weakened bones as a result of osteoporosis or other bone disease may experience a femur fracture from a simple fall in the home. Fractures of the femur near the hip are generally termed "hip fractures," with the term "femur fracture" used for fractures that occur in the shaft of the femur or near the knee.

Femur fractures are classified on the basis of the fracture line, whether the bone fragment breaks through the skin, and the location in which the break occurs. Fractures are classified by types, including simple, comminuted, closed, open, pathological, and stress. Simple fractures consist of a break in only one place in the bone. In a comminuted fracture, the bone is broken in more than two places. In a closed fracture, the skin is not broken by the fracture, while in an open fracture, the skin is broken and the bone fragments are exposed. A pathological fracture occurs after the bone has been weakened by disease, and a stress fracture consists of a gradually occurring break that is so slight that it may not even appear on x-ray. Femur fractures are further classified according to degree, shape, and type of soft-tissue injury.

Incidence and Prevalence: Femur fractures occur at a rate of 3 in 10,000 individuals per year for individuals younger than 25 years and older than 65 years; the rate for individuals outside of those age ranges is 1 in 10,000 individuals per year (Aukerman).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor