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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Fracture, Femur


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Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

The individual is typically hospitalized for at least 2 to 3 days after surgery. Most individuals require additional time off from work, and those who live alone or who have associated injuries may require a stay in a rehabilitation center. The average school or work time lost after femoral fracture is 30 days and the average length of activity restrictions is 107 days (Aukerman). During the healing period, the individual cannot bear any weight on the injured femur and needs to use crutches, usually for at least 8 to 12 weeks. During this time, the individual is unable to do any job that requires more walking than a few steps on crutches or walking up and down stairs.

Pain medications may affect some individual's vision, balance, concentration, and coordination. Company policy on medication usage should be reviewed to determine if pain medication use is compatible with job safety and function. Individuals in jobs that involve heavy lifting require temporary reassignment to a sedentary job. Use of a tall, high-backed chair rather than a soft one may be helpful.

The individual will require time off to attend medical and physical therapy appointments while the leg is healing. Recovery takes about 3 to 9 months, depending on job requirements. After the fracture has healed on x-ray and after at least a year has elapsed from the time of injury, any rods, plates, or screws that are causing local symptoms may be removed. Other internal fixation hardware may remain in place indefinitely. Recovery of pre-injury strength and range of motion may take up to a year. Return to work should be guided by the physician and physical therapist.

Stress fractures are less likely to occur or recur when proper footwear is worn and training techniques for athletic or work activity are followed.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor