Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Fracture, Orbit


Related Terms

  • Blow-out Fracture
  • Eye Socket Fracture
  • Facial Fracture
  • Maxillofacial Injury
  • Orbital Floor Fracture
  • Trapdoor Fracture

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • General Surgeon
  • Ophthalmologist
  • Otolaryngologist
  • Plastic Surgeon

Comorbid Conditions

  • Choroid tear
  • Ciliary body tear or bruising
  • Corneal abrasion
  • Glaucoma
  • Globe rupture
  • Head injuries (concussion or skull fracture)
  • Hyphema
  • Iris disruption
  • Lens dislocation
  • Multiple fractures (skull/face)
  • Ocular Hypotony
  • Ocular muscle entrapment
  • Retinal detachment and tear
  • Scleral tear
  • Sinus infection
  • Sixth Cranial Nerve Paralysis (frequently bilateral)

Factors Influencing Duration

The location and severity of an orbital fracture and the presence of associated facial fractures or concomitant injuries will affect duration of disability. Injury to other body parts will also potentially delay recovery. The individual’s overall condition, degree of debilitation, and need for reconstructive surgery will influence recovery time.

Diplopia is the most common cause of disability following orbital fracture. It can interfere with both distant vision, affecting the ability to drive, and near vision, affecting the ability to operate machinery, type, read, or do other types of close work. Diplopia associated with small fractures that do not require surgical repair often resolves in 1 to 2 weeks; light work may be resumed at that point. Sometimes, diplopia persists with more severe fractures.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
802.6 - Fracture, Orbital Floor (Blow-out), Closed
802.7 - Fracture, Orbital Floor (Blow-out), Open
802.8 - Fracture, Other Facial Bones, Closed; Alveolus; Orbit: NOS, Part Other than Roof or Floor; Palate

Ability to Work (Return to Work Considerations)

Activities requiring physical exertion or those that have a potential to cause further blunt orbital injury may be restricted. Protective facial devices may be required when facial trauma is a possible factor (athletes returning to sports shortly after fracture). Counseling and supportive therapy may be needed if the individual has been disfigured and suffers related self-esteem and performance issues.

In general, an individual may return to heavy work 3 weeks after the injury if surgery is not required. If there has been surgical repair, heavy work is usually contraindicated until at least 3 weeks after surgery. In some cases, numbness of the cheek can persist after surgery.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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