Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Fracture, Pelvis


Related Terms

  • Fracture of Pelvic Bones
  • Pelvis Fracture

Differential Diagnosis

Specialists

  • Critical Care Surgeon
  • General Surgeon
  • Gynecologist
  • Occupational Therapist
  • Orthopedic (Orthopaedic) Surgeon
  • Physiatrist (Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Specialist)
  • Physical Therapist
  • Radiologist
  • Urologist
  • Vascular Surgeon

Comorbid Conditions

  • Blood disorders
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
  • Drug abuse
  • Malnutrition
  • Obesity
  • Osteoporosis
  • Poor physical conditioning
  • Radiation therapy
  • Smoking

Factors Influencing Duration

The severity and stability of the fracture, any associated internal organ damage, and the treatment required (i.e., surgical or nonsurgical) will influence length of disability. Individuals with multiple injuries, with or without complications, may be permanently disabled. Follow-up surgeries to alleviate pain, commonly in the back, may be necessary if conservative treatment is not successful.

Medical Codes

ICD-9-CM:
808 - Fracture, Pelvis
808.0 - Fracture, Acetabulum, Closed
808.1 - Fracture, Acetabulum, Open
808.2 - Fracture, Pubis, Closed
808.3 - Fracture, Pubis, Open
808.4 - Fracture, Pelvis, Other Specified Part, Closed
808.41 - Fracture, Ilium, Closed
808.42 - Fracture, Ischium, Closed
808.43 - Multiple closed pelvic fractures with disruption of pelvic circle
808.49 - Closed Fracture of Other Specified Part of Pelvis
808.5 - Open Fracture of Other Specified Part of Pelvis
808.51 - Fracture, Ilium, Open
808.52 - Fracture, Ischium, Open
808.53 - Multiple open pelvic fractures with disruption of pelvic circle
808.59 - Open Fracture of Other Specified Part of Pelvis
808.8 - Closed Fracture of Pelvis, Unspecified
808.9 - Open Fracture of Pelvis, Unspecified

Rehabilitation

The rehabilitation protocol for a fracture of the pelvis depends on the severity and type of fracture. These fractures vary from stable and uncomplicated fractures, such as a nondisplaced fracture of the pubic ramus, to severe displaced fractures of the weight-bearing portion of the pelvis with associated major injuries to the gastrointestinal tract and/or genitourinary tract.

When weight bearing is indicated, the physical therapist will teach ambulation skills with assistive devices, such as crutches or a walker, as needed (Chapman). If necessary, upper extremity general conditioning exercises are taught to allow for use of assistive devices for gait. Once the fracture is stable, trunk and lower extremity exercises to restore strength, flexibility and endurance are appropriate. As a period of limited function and weight bearing may be necessary, a comprehensive reconditioning program for the lower trunk and lower extremities will be needed to restore function once the fracture is healed (Chapman).

Occupational therapy may be indicated to instruct in transfers and activities of daily living and provide assistive devices needed for independence (Chapman).

Due to the variation of possible pelvic fractures, specific therapy instructions will be determined by the treating physician, based on many factors related to the fracture site and associated injuries.

Bone healing may occur within 6 to 12 weeks; however, the bone strength and the ability of the bone to sustain a heavy load may take up to a year (Chapman). Once healing has occurred, the individual may resume full activities of daily living. It is important to instruct the individual not to overload the fracture site until the bone has regained its full strength. The treating physician should guide the resumption of heavy work and sports.

Individuals who sustain pelvic fractures may expect up to 6 to 12 months of recovery before returning to heavier work (Chapman). A vocational counselor might be necessary for those who are unable to return to their previous occupation due to residual impairment (Bucholz).

FREQUENCY OF REHABILITATION VISITS
Nonsurgical
SpecialistFracture, Pelvis
Physical TherapistUp to 24 visits within 16 weeks
Note on Nonsurgical Guidelines: Hospitalization is often required, even though surgery is not required. If surgery is required, it is not an uncomplicated case.
The table above represents a range of the usual acceptable number of visits for uncomplicated cases. It provides a framework based on the duration of tissue healing time and standard clinical practice.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor






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