Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

General Paresis


Diagnosis

History: The mnemonic "paresis" has been used to describe the manifestations of general paresis: personality changes, affect, reflexes (hyperactive), eyes (Argyll Robertson pupils), sensorium (illusions, delusions, hallucinations), intellect (both long-term and short-term memory loss, and defective orientation, judgment, calculations, and insight), and speech (decreased language ability [aphasia]). The individual or his or her family may also report irritability, impaired concentration, carelessness, fatigue, lethargy, headache, and insomnia. In the later stages of this condition, symptoms include muscle weakness, defective judgment, depression, psychosis, dementia, confusion, disorientation, paranoia, and seizures. The final stage of the disease may include frequent seizures, incontinence, and recurrent strokes. The individual may voluntarily report prior syphilis infection, but since the initial infection may have occurred many years earlier, the individual may not make the association between the current symptoms and the previous infection.

Physical exam: Individuals may present with tremors of the lips, tongue, and fingers; slurred speech; difficulty writing; unsteadiness; decreased muscle tone; muscle weakness; lack of facial expressions; and small, nonreactive pupils (Argyll Robertson pupils). Other conditions associated with late-stage syphilis infection may also be present, such as tabes dorsalis, another disease that affects the nervous system. Individuals may also exhibit psychological instability that mimics schizophrenia, mania, paranoia, or depression.

Tests: Blood (serologic) tests are first conducted to identify the cause of infection. If syphilis is detected, then a lumbar puncture procedure is performed to obtain a small amount of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Study of the CSF fluid can confirm diagnosis and provide a baseline to gauge the effectiveness of future treatment.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor