Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Glomerulonephritis, Acute


Overview

Acute glomerulonephritis results when the ball-shaped networks of specialized capillaries in the kidney (glomeruli) that control filtering and excretion become inflamed and unable to function properly. With the selective filtering mechanism damaged, blood and protein are suddenly lost in the urine (hematuria and proteinuria), excess body fluids accumulate (edema) (the protein in the bloodstream maintains fluid balance), and high blood pressure (hypertension) with or without a decrease in the excretion of urine (oliguria) occurs. Most often, the inflammation that triggers the disease stems from an immune response to a specific bacterium called Streptococcus. Typically, the body launches this immune response when the bacteria attack the lungs or, less commonly, the skin.

Other bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites may also trigger such a response, but it is less common. Acute glomerulonephritis may also stem from systemic causes that affect the body as a whole, and for a variety of reasons, also result in compromised glomerular function. Some of these conditions are hypersensitivity vasculitis, Wegener granulomatosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, polyarteritis nodosa, cryoglobinemia, and Goodpasture syndrome. Because it is the dominant specific cause of acute glomerulonephritis, this topic will focus on the streptococcal origins of glomerulonephritis.

There are two forms of acute glomerulonephritis: postinfectious glomerulonephritis and infectious glomerulonephritis. Postinfectious glomerulonephritis typically occurs about 21 days after a respiratory or skin infection with Streptococcus. Infectious glomerulonephritis occurs during or within a few days of streptococcal infection. The disease may result in hypertension, edema, and kidney failure. Of the two types, postinfectious glomerulonephritis (also called acute poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis) is the most common.

The most common risk factor for development of postinfectious glomerulonephritis is an untreated streptococcal infection of the respiratory tract and, less commonly, of the skin (impetigo).

Incidence and Prevalence: There has been a significant decline in the incidence of acute glomerulonephritis in developed countries such as the US, and cases are reported only sporadically. The declining incidence rates are probably related to improved nutritional status in these countries and more liberal use of antibiotics. Developing countries, such as those in Africa and the Caribbean where there is a high incidence of skin infections, appear to have a higher potential for development of streptococcal infections, and the incidence of acute glomerulonephritis is proportionally higher in these areas (Geetha).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor