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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Glomerulonephritis, Chronic


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Diagnosis

History: Individuals with chronic glomerulonephritis may report a vague feeling of weakness or discomfort (malaise), increasing irritability and mental cloudiness, a metallic taste in the mouth, excretion of large amounts of urine (polyuria), excessive urination at night (nocturia), headache, dizziness, and digestive disturbances. If the disease has progressed, the individual may complain of breathing difficulties (dyspnea) and pain in the chest (angina).

Physical exam: Examination may reveal weight loss, fluid retention (edema), and most often, high blood pressure (hypertension). It is not uncommon for the individual with chronic glomerulonephritis to have nosebleeds; signs of blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis); an enlarged heart (cardiomegaly); and bleeding (hemorrhage) into the kidneys, lungs, eye tissue (retina), and brain (cerebrum). Physical examination of the back (fundus) of the eye may reveal vessel changes and edema of the optic discs (papilledema).

Tests: A laboratory test of the urine (urinalysis) should be done to determine its specific gravity and protein content and whether it contains white blood cells, kidney tubular cells, and hemoglobin. Blood tests should include a complete blood count (CBC) to test for low hemoglobin in the bloodstream (anemia). Ultrasound and CT scan may be used to visualize the kidneys. A small sample of tissue may be taken from the kidney (renal biopsy) for microscopic examination to verify diagnosis in those individuals who have no prior history of kidney disease.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor