Sign-in
(your email):
(case sensitive):



 
 

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Tonic-Clonic Seizure


Text Only Home | Graphic-Rich Site | Overview | Risk and Causation | Diagnosis | Treatment | Prognosis | Differential Diagnosis | Specialists | Rehabilitation | Comorbid Conditions | Complications | Factors Influencing Duration | Length of Disability | Ability to Work | Maximum Medical Improvement | Failure to Recover | Medical Codes | References

Overview

Tonic-clonic seizures, formerly called grand mal seizures, are caused by abnormal electrical activity in the brain. Normal human activities, thoughts, perceptions, and emotions are produced by electrical impulses that stimulate nerve cells in the brain. During a seizure, the usual electrochemical communication in the brain is disrupted by a chaotic and unregulated discharge. Seizures are a symptom of brain dysfunction and can be the result of a wide variety of diseases or injuries. Seizures are usually due to unknown factors affecting brain electrical activity (idiopathic seizures) but may be associated with birth trauma, head injury, central nervous system infections, brain tumor, stroke, ingestion of toxic substances, or metabolic imbalance.
Epilepsy is the diagnosis given when an individual has repeated seizure episodes over time. In about 60% of new diagnoses of epilepsy, there is no apparent cause (Epilepsy Foundation).

Incidence and Prevalence: In the US, 300,000 individuals have their first convulsion each year, of which about 180,000 are adults. According to the Epilepsy Foundation, 10% of all Americans will experience at least one seizure during their lifetime. Only 20% to 25% or seizures are generalized tonic-clonic type seizures; the rest are partial or localized seizures (Ko, Generalized). About 3% of the population in the US is classified as having epilepsy, and active uncontrolled epilepsy occurs in less than 1% of individuals. The lifetime likelihood of experiencing an epileptic seizure is approximately 9%. The lifetime likelihood of having a diagnosis of epilepsy is almost 3%. The prevalence of active epilepsy is about 0.8% (Ko, Epilepsy).

Source: Medical Disability Advisor