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Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Job Classification

In most duration tables, five job classifications are displayed. These job classifications are based on the amount of physical effort required to perform the work. The classifications correspond to the Strength Factor classifications described in the United States Department of Labor's Dictionary of Occupational Titles. The following definitions are quoted directly from that publication.

Sedentary Work Exerting up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force occasionally and/or a negligible amount of force frequently or constantly to lift, carry, push, pull, or otherwise move objects, including the human body. Sedentary work involves sitting most of the time, but may involve walking or standing for brief periods of time. Jobs are sedentary if walking and standing are required only occasionally and other sedentary criteria are met.

Light Work Exerting up to 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force occasionally and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of force frequently, and/or negligible amount of force constantly to move objects. Physical demand requirements are in excess of those for Sedentary Work. Light Work usually requires walking or standing to a significant degree. However, if the use of the arm and/or leg controls requires exertion of forces greater than that for Sedentary Work and the worker sits most the time, the job is rated Light Work.

Medium Work Exerting up to 50 (22.7 kg) pounds of force occasionally, and/or up to 25 pounds (11.3 kg) of force frequently, and/or up to 10 pounds (4.5 kg) of forces constantly to move objects.

Heavy Work Exerting up to 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or up to 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Very Heavy Work Exerting in excess of 100 pounds (45.4 kg) of force occasionally, and/or in excess of 50 pounds (22.7 kg) of force frequently, and/or in excess of 20 pounds (9.1 kg) of force constantly to move objects.

Heart Valve Replacement


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Rehabilitation

Respiratory therapy begins in the intensive care unit as soon as the breathing tube (endotracheal tube) is removed. Respiratory therapy focuses on preventing the buildup of lung secretions that can lead to pneumonia and re-inflating the lungs to their presurgical condition. Respiratory therapists teach individuals techniques to increase airflow and use incentive devices to encourage deep breathing and effective cough techniques.

Cardiac rehabilitation begins in the hospital shortly after the immediate postoperative period and focuses on helping individuals resume a more normal lifestyle following surgery. Phase 1 often begins in the hospital with low levels of exercise to help prevent the hazards of bed rest, reduce episodes of low blood pressure when changing positions (orthostatic hypotension), and maintain overall mobility of the body. Intensity gradually increases until discharge from the hospital.

Phase 2 usually begins after discharge from the hospital. Individuals not hospitalized typically begin rehabilitation at this phase, which is done in a cardiac rehabilitation center. The goals are to improve the individual's functional capacity by increasing physical endurance, promoting return to activity, providing education about lifestyle changes, reducing fear and anxiety, and helping the individual make good social and psychological adjustments following surgery.

Individuals are usually attached to an electrocardiograph (ECG) monitor, and a physical therapist keeps a daily log of the individual's blood pressure, heart rate, and cardiac rhythm. Individuals perform aerobic exercise, such as treadmill walking or stationary bicycling. Aerobic exercise helps the heart muscle improve efficiency of oxygen use, reducing the need for the heart to pump as much blood. The improved fitness level reduces the total workload of the heart and increases endurance, enabling individuals to return to their prior activity levels. The program is modified as needed for each individual.

Phase 3 continues in an outpatient setting with gradually increasing levels of exercise and the addition of more physically demanding exercises. The goal is to increase aerobic activity in a stepwise fashion to promote cardiovascular endurance and strength so the individual may return to work or resume prior activity levels. For the rest of their lives, these individuals need to take antibiotics before undergoing any dental work or surgery to prevent bacterial endocarditis.

Source: Medical Disability Advisor